Asbestos tile in basement

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I have the 9x9" asbestos tile in my basement, and I wonder if it would be ok to just remove the loose tiles, and then glue linoleum on top of them? Also smooth out the removed tiles with floor cement compound.
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I have the 9x9" asbestos tile in my basement, and I wonder if it would be ok to just remove the loose tiles, and then glue linoleum on top of them? Also smooth out the removed tiles with floor cement compound.
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What did the pro's say when you called them?
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jim wrote:

Eek!
Don't call the pros!
If they confirm you actually HAVE asbestos, you may face thousands of dollars in expense to have a certified, licensed, approved, and circumcised asbestos abatement removal company render your home indistinguishable from major storm damage.
You neighbors will shun you and your kids after noticing moon-suits parading around.
Further, you will forever have to disclose to any potential buyer that you're trying to sell you home before the rest of your family dies from cancer-causing compounds.
Said the poet: "Ignorance is bliss."
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On 1/31/2011 12:02 PM, woods wrote:

Lordy, what a tempest in a teapot. Asbestos floor tile, unless sanded or run through a chipper, is not 'friable'. If the remaining tiles are solid, fill the holes and cover. If the remaining tiles are loose, pop them off, double-bag in opaque bags so a nosy neighbor or trash man doesn't drop a dime on you, and move on. Scrape, shovel, and shut up. Disturbing intact asbestos causes more exposure than leaving it in place would. All those grade schools they spent a bazillion dollars 'abating' the asbestos in? A good coat of a flexible paint would have provided as much safety, in most cases, at a fraction of the cost. General public thinks asbestos is like radioactive waste, and sharks are taking advantage of that.
--
aem sends....

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aemeijers wrote:

What's this "friable" nonsense! It's ASBESTOS for cryin' out loud! Murder, dead, kill! Its mere presence will suck the precious bodily fluids right out of you.
Think of the children!
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LOL. This question must have been asked hundreds of times here now. Here's my two cents:
Google is your friend. It won't be hard to find advice from various sources on how to deal with floor tile containing asbestos. In paricular, if you want to follow the letter of the law, I'd look for guidelines for your state and/or municipality. In general, if the tiles are intact and you aren't sanding them, sawing them, etc, they can safely be removed by a reasonable homeowner. If you're unreasonable, ie scare to death of asbestos and will live forever in fear, then maybe it's worth it to hire a professional removal company.
The other issue here is the dondition of the remaining tiles. As some others have pointed out, if the remaining tiles are indeed firmly in place, then I would not fill in the spaces of the loose ones. I'd glue the loose ones back down, which will be far easier. If you try to fill in the missing ones, it would seem to me that you're going to have to then level it off somehow, which could lead to sanding, which aint a good idea.....see above.
But I would tend to agree with the poster who said that if some of them are loose, the others may not be far behind. What happens to your new floor when that happens later? Another alternative might be to cover the whole thing first with some appropriate sheet material, fastening it to the concrete with a Hilti gun, etc. Just a thought....
But before doing that, or covering it in any way, I'd also consider the state laws on disclosure for real estate sales. Most have them now and they typically ask if the house is known to contain asbestos. While nothing says you have to remove it, it's just one more potential issue to deal with if the buyer willing to buy it starts bitching....
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On Feb 1, 9:55am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

This is of course the major potential pitfall. Doing stuff incorrectly, and/or conveniently not mentioning it at the time of sale, could have serious financial consequences down the road - even well after the house is sold. Chalk it up to living in our age.
R
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On 2/1/2011 9:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

(snip)
Right up front, IANAL. While most of us on here know MOST 9x9 tiles contain asbestos tiles, absent a lab test of the tiles in a particular basement, do we KNOW those tiles are asbestos-laden? Anybody know what the case law is? If homeowner isn't SURE, does he have plausible deniability and legal protection?
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Yes. While everyone is familiar with the adage, "Ignorance of the law is no excuse," there is a complementary rule, "Ignorance of the facts IS an excuse."
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wrote:

But judge, I was SURE they were asphault tiles.
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That's a good point. I'm not even sure it's true that most tiles that are still installed today contain asbestos. It was widely used long ago, but that use discontinued decades ago and presumably a lot of them have been replaced. And if you don't know yours have it, then I would think in many cases you could honestly answer a real estate disclosure without raising any concerns.
Which is why it's a good idea to take a look at the specific disclosure laws for the state in question. Some states like NJ, have a form with a list of specific questions that have to be answered. Ours is particulalry stupid and a high school student could design a better one. Among the stupid questions: Has there ever been repairs made to the roof? If so, then it wants an explanation. WTF? A more reasonable question might be "Do you know of any leaks and have any repairs been made to the roof in the last two years? I guess we need a maintenance log, like for an aircraft now for our homes.
"Yes, I replaced one missing shingle after the northeaster of 92."
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Not only is the question goofey, but (if you quoted it correctly) is ghastly grammar.
It should read: "HAVE there ever been..."
Lawrence J. Peter once said: "I have been studying government, man and boy, for over forty years. I have yet to discover whether we are being led by well-meaning fools, or by really intelligent people who are just putting us on."
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 07:28:33 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

We had to fill out a similar form when we sold our house in VT. "Yes, the roof was replaced in ...". No problem. Look at it as protection. If you list it there they can't come back later and say there was a leak. "...well, yeah!"
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On 1/31/2011 12:02 PM, woods wrote:

I can't give construction specifics but as far as asbestos exposure, it is OK. I'd be more concerned about filling voids with cement that may sag. The asbestos is not going any where.
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It's OK for the OP to be exposed to asbestos? How do you feel about him wearing seat belts? Is that unnecessary as well? Sheesh.
OP: Asbestos is only a problem when the fibers get airborne, which they do quite readily. It's your home and your health, and technically you're supposed to call to have the guys in the moon suits in to do it, but that's overkill for floor tile in my opinion.
I can't tell you what you should do, but I would definitely suit up, wear a N95 dust mask or respirator, and wet everything down prior to starting. If I saw any dust at all I'd know I haven't wet things down enough, and I'd have plenty of lighting so I'd be sure to notice the dust. I'd use plastic and tape off the area, tape doors closed, and have one window in the basement open with a fan blowing out. That would create negative air pressure in the work space, and any minor amount of dust that did manage to get airborne wouldn't escape into the rest of the house.
I'd put everything in a doubled up contractor trash bags inside a trash can with some newspaper on the bottom to prevent the corners of the tile from cutting through the bags, and I wouldn't let the trash can get too heavy. I'd spray down the stuff inside the bag just before tying it up - can you tell I think wetting the stuff down is the critical step, yet? I'd move slowly when tying up the bags as squeezing them quickly tends to puff out some air, and that could carry dust. And I'd pass the bags out through another basement window so I wouldn't be traipsing through the house with the stuff. I'd work in smaller sections where I could keep the tile and everything else wet without drenching the basement, and I'd pick up the wet slurry with a wet dry vacuum with a HEPA filter that I'd be prepared to toss when I'm done (the filter, not the vacuum!). I wouldn't be sucking up standing puddles, but more like wet slurry to prevent clogging the vaccum filter.
At the end of everything it should be wiped down with wet rags and they would be tossed in the trash when done. I wouldn't want to be going back and forth from a bucket of water, wringing out the rags like I'd normally do when wiping things down, as that would inevitably leave some asbestos fibers behind.
I think you get the idea of how I'd go about it - I'd be fastidious about it. You're only going to do it once, and no matter how you look at it it's going to take a full day to do it safely, and it's no big deal.
R
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On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:09:43 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

If he does not break opr remove the tiles he will NOT be "exposed" to asbestos. He is best to just reglue the loose ones and cover it up with a solid vinyl floor covering.

It is a vinyl asbestos tile, with the asbestos encapsulated very well. As long as it is not broken up/removed there will be NO fibres loose - and even if removing the tile, unless you need to break them up badly, very little exposure.
The following recomendations are likely gross overkill, but would definitely be a safe way to go about removing the tile

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On 1/31/2011 1:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's right. Asbestos is encapsulated. If dust is generated, you should wear a dust mask no matter what the dust is.
The general public thinks the asbestos is going to jump out at you ;)
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wrote:

I usually washed the dust down the drain, at least after the first 2 years (was a mechanic since 1969)

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On Jan 31, 6:46pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Maybe I should have put a smiley...? ;)
BTW, you top-posting maroon - you do know that it makes it impossible to complete a joke when you top post. You're like the idjit that spits out the punch line when other people haven't heard the joke yet.
Oh, sorry. Almost forgot. ;)
R
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