around the house drainage

i'm looking to drain the entire exterior perimeter of my house, which is at the bottom of a hill that dumps quite a bit of rainwater against my walls. here's my plan, please tell me what i can do to improve upon it: dig a trench around the entire house lay down 3/4" stone lay down perforated pipe on top of the stone with a slight grade for adequate drainage cover pipe with more stone, filter fabric and dirt connect all the pipes to a solid 4" pipe that will drain to a local creek
thanks for your feedback, chris
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Dig your trench to the house's footing, and while your there, redo whatever waterproofing is against the house, below grade

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If that creek isn't entirely on your property you should check to see that you are allowed to drain into it. I know around here that is prohibited.
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if your trying to dry your basement you must dig BELOW the level of the footer, and even then water may rise up from under the floor slab.
your much better off cost and disruption wise to install a interior french drain with a gravity drain to daylight.
having done BOTH the exterior one costs a fortune, ruins plantings, requires sidewalk replacements, and by the time your done you will need a whole new lawn,.
been there done all this, and worse still had water problems that were fixed by a interior french drain at a fraction of the price......
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it's mostly for the attached garage which is finished and is at the bottom of a hill. i'm not sure how the water is getting in - whether it's wicking up from the bottom or coming in from the side. -chris
wrote:

if your trying to dry your basement you must dig BELOW the level of the footer, and even then water may rise up from under the floor slab.
your much better off cost and disruption wise to install a interior french drain with a gravity drain to daylight.
having done BOTH the exterior one costs a fortune, ruins plantings, requires sidewalk replacements, and by the time your done you will need a whole new lawn,.
been there done all this, and worse still had water problems that were fixed by a interior french drain at a fraction of the price......
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either problem least costly solution is interior french drain, every block cavity is opened at bottom to under the slab drain thru perforated pipe.
exterior is the right way, but drain line MUST be below footer level and even then at base of hill may not be successful..
today many communities require interior french drain in every new home.
wet basements are a PIA that can lead to mold and other nasty troubles
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You are on the bottom of a hill so you should try to divert water from ever hitting your house, water should drain away not to it. The idea would be to divert water around the house with raised areas up hill and underground drainage. Do you home also with drain a french drain system, but you have to go to the bottom of the foundation. Alot of work and money to do it right, so research it and even hire an engineer ao you dont waste money.
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