Are these Carpenter Bees?

Saw a couple of these bees hovering near (and then crawling underneath) the diagonal fascia board (or wood trim) at gable side of building near roof line. Directed some wasp and hornet bug spray underneath the diagonal piece of wood, but a couple days later these bees were still active there. It does look like some sawdust-like debris is present near the ground...actually noticed the sawdust-like debris last year but didn't notice happen to notice the bees back then. Are the bees in the photos carpenter bees, and should I contact the condo association?
Here are a link to 3 photos:
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeofpch/bee1.jpg
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeofpch/bee2.jpg
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeofpch/bee3.jpg
These bees were near the back of building.
In addition (in a completely different area of same side of building) there are also some ordinary bees nests (such as wasps nests) underneath the diagonal fascia board near, but near the front of the same side of building. (The building is around 40 feet long from front to back) Do I need to be concerned about the ordinary bees nests if there is no activity seen? Right now I'm more concerned about whether or not the bees in the photos are carpenter bees. What do you think?
Thanks,
J.
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I am not sure it they are carpenter bees or not; but, they look like some bees I found inside a cedar 2x4 fence runner. I picked up this piece of lumber from a neighbor and noticed it had holes in it but it was in the winter time. Came spring, and I noticed bees (similar to the ones in your photo) coming out of the holes. I got some caulk and started plugging holes. Later I cut that 2x4 and found approx. 15 dead bees inside..they had a tunnel built the length of the 10 ft 2x4. I thought the 2x4 was awful light. If they are the same bees....they eat a lot of wood. You mentioned sawdust..... sounds like the same bee. You might try using seivn dust if you can blow enough into the holes...they will carry the dust to the other bees. (some states outlaw professionals use of seivn dust or powder on Honey- bees).
Jay-n-123 wrote:

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wrote:

Another recommendation was to put mothballs in the holes before filling them.
By sawdust I assume you mean a dribble of wet sawdust (which has then dried.)

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My mom in law has swarms of these bees. As soon as you go near her house they fly over to you and watch what you're doing. They're drilling holes into the overhang on her house. It's a varnished wood and they love it. I've seen powdery sawdust floating down out of the holes. I can hear them inside chewing. Least that's what it sounds like. She won't get an exterminater.

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No, it will be plain sawdust in most cases as they do not eat wood. They tunnle into it to make nests which is why most pestisides do not work on them as they don't eat it.

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wrote:

I'm not saying that it always looks like wet sawdust that dried, or that they eat it. Perhaps they only spit on it. But I know I had carpenter bees and that's what it looked like for me.
I saw one out the window a couple days ago, only a foot or two from where they were living 2 or 3 years ago. I have to go outside and see if he was scouting or commuting. I'm glad I didn't return the ladder I borrowed.

That might be the advantage of mothballs.
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Yes that's them. Next thing you'll get is woodpeckers.
Think I'm kidding?
Wait.
They do a lot of damage. Best to get rid of them.

Ordinary bees don't do any damage to buildings that I've noticed. If they aren't bothering you leave them alone.
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wrote:

I would try to get rid of the bees if they were getting into any wood in the house.
As for woodpeckers, my nextdoor neighbor is replacing a lot of wood on his house from them. To prevent their return, not having insects is key, but also a few strategically placed mirrors will probably help keep them away.
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writes:

We had a woodpecker in the neighborhood. It was crazy. It wasn't pecking on wood, but on galvanized metal caps on the chimney. Also on the top bar of a metal swing set.
When it was pecking on the chimney caps at 5am it sure made a lot of noise echoing down the chimney into the house.

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on 5/24/2007 12:29 PM Lisa BB. said the following:

Don't leave alcohol around outside. :-)

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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X-No-Archive: Yes

<snip>
I had a similar experience with a roofed deck beam. They look like bumble bees but indeed have a great boring ability in wood. I did tremendous research into 'carpenter bees' and learned much about them. They bore almost exactly 2" up from the bottom of a board and then turn 90 degrees and bore horizontally and carve individual caverns for their larva. Quite fascinating if it's not your fence or facia ;)
I had 100% success by just waiting until they turned 90 degrees and then filled the hole (bee inside) with silicone (or caulk). One actually managed to get back out but he/she had quite a silicone helmet and was pleasantly preserved head first on the deck. I did try other methods to disuade their activity but they seem very persistant no matter what you spray on the holes, even 13% chlorine.
They don't seem to attack in droves so a hole by hole prevention has been quite successful for me at least.
BTW, new bees will carry on from last seasons progress so it's important to keep the holes plugged
Good luck with your new friends :P
Gary
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I find it good sport to whack them with a Badmitten racket when they Hover.good exercise and a game you can play alone.May not get rid of them completely but have some fun doing it. Good luck!

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on 5/24/2007 2:19 PM elmodman1@hotmail said the following:

I sat outside my shed under a canopy with a can of wasp and hornet spray. When ever this one would hover around the facia, I would give her a shot, which would send her flying away, only to come back within a few seconds. I know I had to have hit her a half dozen times with a stream, but she still came back. OK, I was sitting there with a couple of beers, but I don't think it affected my aim. :-)

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Somehow this sounds like a scene from Alice in Wonderland.

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on 5/23/2007 8:32 PM Jay-n-123 said the following:

Yep, that's them. I had a few that carved up the gable end 3/4" 2-by facia on the two sheds I have. I became aware of them when I noticed the vinyl siding had brown stains from their excrement running down from the holes they dug behind the facia board. I finally bought some vinyl 3/4" J channel and nailed it to the bottom edges of the facia boards this spring. The nailing strip of the J channel extends up alongside the vinyl siding's J channel so they can't bore in anymore. They only bore out of sight and the weather, so the holes are hidden, unless you trap one in there that isn't dead and she will bore out anywhere to escape.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Are they wearing a tool belt with a hammer and saw? They could be electrician or plumber bees too...... LOL.....
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