Are saddle valves replaceable?

Have a saddle valve on some copper pipe that was put there (by prev. home owner) to provide water to the refrigerator's icemaker. We have a different fridge with a different size hookup, so I bought a copper tubing kit to replace the existing plastic line and fittings. The saddle valve that's in there now leaks (out the tube, not onto the ground). You turn it off all the way and it still dribbles a bit. Not a lot- it takes probably 24hrs to nearly fill up a 12oz water bottle it's in right now. Of course, once I connect it to the fridge the valve will be open and the icemaker itself will valve the line open/closed. Problem not solved, but avoided.
The kit that I bought has a new saddle valve in it. Are saddle valves the type of things where you have one shot at? i.e., if i pull the saddle valve off the copper pipe, is that section of pipe now ruined and it will be impossible to get anything to seal up to it now, including a saddle valve, *even* if it's identical in all sizes and dimensions?
I'm torn as to whether i should fix it now or leave it until it's really necessary to fool with it.
TIA!
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You should be fine; there is nothing permanent about them. Just be sure to shut the water off first and relieve the pressure.
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Since this is downstairs and there is upstairs plumbing, does that mean opening the a sink valve on both levels to let the water in the pipes upstairs drain all the way down also?
Any special attention to the gas boiler and gas waterheater when turning the water off? I suppose that if either of those decide to drain out and then fire up it wouldn't be good for them.....
thx
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That should do it

Won't matter for the water heater; though there is a small possibility that the heater will put some pressure in the line you are working on. It is not a big deal either way, but you might as well turn down the heater temperature to stop it from turning on.
I don't know anything about boilers, but would guess that just turning your thermostat down will take care of it.
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Turn off power to boiler and water heater while the water is off...
Make sure both have water back on before reapplying power.
Probably not all that neccesary cause its a pretty quick repair but better safe than sorry.
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wrote:

Good. Polyethylene can spring a leak at any time. Mine did and I had gone of my way not to put any kinks or sharp bends in it. Sprayed all over my basement file cabinet, which had one drawer open.
Put the point of the new saddle valve in the hole from the old saddle valve. After you get it positioned and you clamping it a little bit, you can back off the needle so you don't make the hole bigger than it was. That way, in theory, you can turn off the water at the saddle valve, although after a decade I have trouble doing that..

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Yes, you can replace the saddle valve. Sounds like you need someone more experienced to work with you.
A couple of hints: Find the puncture hole, and drill about 1/8 or slightly larger drill hole at that point.
Close the valve so the pointy thing sticks into the tube, and then gently install. Wiggle the valve around so the pointy thing is in the center of the drilled hole.
Expect to have to tighten the nut around the valve shaft after you've got it all through.
There's a few other hints, but you'll have to learn them the hard way like everyone else. This is your mission. Do not fail.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Saddle valves always leak eventually. Eventually out the side.
You're okay for the time being, but if you get to the point where you want to replace the saddle valve, replace it with a T and a real valve, and appropriate reducers to the tubing.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Ya Saddle valves are replaceable. Probably not the answer you were looking for but I replace every one I have come across with a 1/4 turn ball valve fitting. Even when a kit comes with a new saddle valve I won't use it. Of course you must know how to solder pipe fittings, and the 1/4 turn valves are more expensive, but well worth the trouble IMHO. That goes for all the faucet, toilet, dishwasher shutoffs in the house as well. Kevin
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This is Turtle.
Install a new needle valve by it'self and run the water to the new refrigerator from it. Now like chris said you should get new fitting and tee into the line and do away with these Michey Mouse needle valves. It would make a much better job here.
now take the needle valve that leaks through the valve and go to the hard ware store and get you a compression cap to put on the old needle valve and your though with fooling with it.
Now if this is a needle valve your going to use for the water to be sent to the refrigerator as ice maker and water in the door. Whirlpool states in there service manual that needle valves will not supply enough water for the ice maker to work properly. They recommend that you have a full open gate or ball valve to be at the pipe source for the water and not a needle valve. Just a thought here.
TURTLE
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Yes, but there are two types. One type is self-piercing, the other requires drilling a small hole. If you have the type that needs to be drilled, use a hand drill (not electric) to drill the hole. Be sure to turn of the water and relieve pressure by opening a cold water tap somewhere.
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hire the plumber to replace the old wax toilet seal, install an anti-freeze hosecock, and install the icemaker, and you'll feel like you got your money's worth.
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