Appliance Hose Connections

We recently bought a new wash machine. The installers could not remove the hoses from the faucets, seems they maybe limed on. The installers suggested a plumber with a torch may be able to remove the hoses. I have applied WD-40 many times to no avail. Can someone suggest a way to loosen these hose connections without having to resort to an expensive plumber? Thanks for any help...
--
Mary



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Depends; if all the plumbing is plastic then force may not be your friend, but if it is metal, a sharp smack to a vicegrip on the hose nut would likely loosen it. Even if the plumbing isn't up to impact you can put a second vicegrip on the hose bib so you can absorb the blow with your other hand, assuming there is room.
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Faucet faces down, maybe a few drops of Lime away might get down the threads and loosen it. There are strap wrenches that might give enough grip without ruining the hose fitting.
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ransley wrote:

Hi, Lime? Soak with CLR and use channel lock wrench.
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On Mon, 2 Feb 2009 05:52:32 -0800 (PST), ransley

Ruin the hose fitting. He should be getting new hoses at this stage.
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If it is lime then vinegar [or if you are real adventurous a little muriatic acid] will be more effective than wd40.
Can't see it from here- but if it was mine, I'd hold the valve securely and have at it with a pair of channel lock Grip-locks .
http://www.channellock.com/acb/stores/1/category.cfm?SID=1&Category_ID=7 If they failed I'd get the vice grips out. [and in both cases, though I'm a big fan of cheap tools- you'll save yourself a lot of headaches with the real thing]
With the vice grips you want to tighten them down enough to ever-so-slightly deform the hose connection. Try to turn- rotate the vice grips to grab at 90degrees from the first try- and try again. I imagine you've got it off by now- but if you don't- now try to run some more vinegar in there- and go sip a cold drink for an hour or so.
If it still doesn't come off- see how hard it will be to replace that valve because it has been there too long and is likely to be the next thing to go.
Jim
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On Mon, 02 Feb 2009 08:15:05 -0500, MLS wrote:

Question for Experts:
Is WD-40 a similar product to Liquid Wrench? I thought WD-40 was for lubrication, while Liquid Wrench was what would be called for in cases like this. (If hoses of OP's problem are metal threaded connectors.)
(This is based on a plumber needing to open a 3 inch sewer clean-out who disdainfully remarked on the use of WD-40 for rusted black iron pip.)
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Phil Again wrote:

WD40 is not a lubricant. The WD means "Water Displacement" which is the intended use. It has light aromatics that quickly evaporate and leave a gummy residue. One of the best ways to ruin stuff is to "lubricate" them with WD40.
while Liquid Wrench was what would be called for in cases

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Phil Again wrote:

WD-40 is NOT a lubricant. NOR is it a rust buster.. It is a water displacement product. Nothing more.
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-snip-

Yes it is.

And it also does that

That's what it was developed to do. http://www.snopes.com/business/names/wd40.asp

But it does a bunch of other stuff, too. Some things better than others-- and some things better than any other product. http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp
Jim
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MLS wrote:

channel lock pliers. i guarantee they'll come off. Might want to kill the supply incase you twist the entire valve off.
steve
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MLS wrote:

Remember when you go back with the new stuff.... A little automotive antisieze compound goes a long ways in this area.
s
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"MLS" ...

PB Blaster.
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I doubt that it is lime that is causing it to stick. More likely corrosion. If the spigot is copper and the hose fitting steel it will corrode due to the electrolysis between the two metals. Keep at it with the wd-40 or some other chemical that can help penetrate and then use channel-locks, vice-grips or a small pipe wrench to work it loose. Don't be afraid to try tightening it a bit as well. Sometimes it will break loose this way easier and then back off with a little elbow grease!

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Haven't got time to read the whole thread, but try tightening the connection a bit too. If it moves at all, that will be good all around.
And Liquid WRench is much better for this than WD-40. Put it on and follow the directions which say to hit the thing with something hard, to set up vibrations and let it sit.
Might try like Channel-Lock pliers, the ones that have curved jaws, to get a grip on more than two points.
I suppose you can even try a hacksaw on the metal fittings. Don't saw into the faucet.
When you get new you're supposed to turn the faicets off every time you finish using the machine for the day, but if you don't do that, at least get woven stainless steel clad hoses.
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BTW, when I said hack saw, I meant to saw diagonally, or parallel to the hose if possible, so that you sould be cutting the entire width of the circumference. And don't saw far enogh to damage the faucet. Your just trying to weaken the the hose part that screws on.
But this is probably the last technique I would use.
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A lot depends on the type of valve that is there. If it's brass, then two pair of channel locks are appropriate. One pair on the faucet, to help keep the faucet from turning.
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Christopher A. Young
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