Anyone moved to LED Lighting?

Page 5 of 16  

"Stormin Mormon" wrote:

The brake light on my M109R consists of an array of *very* bright LEDs. I added a flasher module to make it even more noticeable. In SW Florida you need all the protection you can get, especially during snow-bird season. :^)
--

Regards,
Robert L Bass
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For sure, good lighting is essential. What's the bag limit on snow birds, or are they a nussiance creature, and you're encourged to shoot all you want?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Stormin Mormon" wrote:

The bag limit works in reverse with these "birds". The typical conversation in their car goes something like this:
Blue Hair: "George, you just ran a red light!"
No Hair: "Oh, am I driving?"
Regards, Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 20:43:59 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

A lot of new cars already come equipped with LED tail Lights. They are very bright, and if one LED fails, you still have a lot of light. The only thing I don't like about them on my car is that there is no warmth generated to de-ice the lenses in winter. Tail light lenses are plastic, so there is a limit to how much you can do to clear them with an ice scraper without scratching them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Right, my original comment was referring to retrofitting LEDs in an older vehicle. Nothing good seems to be available there, at least not in a plug and play (or nearly so) solution.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've seen plenty of direct replacements for 1157 incandescents, complete with standard bayonet base.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I've tried a couple out of curiosity, they range from "OK but about half the apparent brightness of a 1034 or 1157" or "so dim you'd have to be insane to even think about using them." Nothing actually "acceptable."
None of the vendors of same are willing to put in their documentation a comparison of brightness between their "bulbs" and a standard 1034/1157.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I haven't tried them myself, as my cars already have LED tail and brake lights. My greatest experience is in use of LED's to replace interior lights in yachts, as well as Navigation lights, which have very strict requirements set by the government. They have to be visible for a specified distance, and in specific arcs of coverage, both vertical and horizontal. They need to have full brightness in the specified coverage parameters. Obviously single LED's won't do that, which seems to completely stymie Josepi. The simple answer is that most LED replacements for incandesent bulbs in almost ANY application other than indicator lights on a panel, are accomplished by use of arrays of LED's, not a single LED.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
salty wrote:

Therein lies the problem. Lamp housings using reflectors or prismatic lenses for nav lights and other purposes are designed to use a light coming from a single point. Incandescent bulbs do that rather well. An LED array can't work as well in that type of lamp because only a few of the LEDs are at the focal point. Light emitted from the rest of the LEDs will be scattered in wrong directions.
That does not mean that LEDs can't serve well in nav lights -- only that they don't work well as replacements for standard bulbs in *existing* lamps. If someone designs a lamp around light coming from the broad surface of an LED array it may turn out to be a better choice for sailboats. Sailing is in that respect analogous to living "off the grid." Folks interested in learning ways to conserve energy might learn a lot from folks who sail.
--

Regards,
Robert L Bass
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Nov 2009 14:37:57 -0500, "Robert L Bass"

You are already off course. ;-)

Way off course. The alarms are now sounding and crew are running up on deck.

Not true. As I said, they have to perform to strict legal standards - and they do. I did not replace any fixtures for my nav lights. All done with drop in LED arrays made to completely and legally reproduce the same or better light. Couldn't do it if they didn't comply. LED's can be mounted in arrays on the surface of any shape in order to give full brightness in all directions needed. They individually have a fairly narrow beam, but you simply mount a bunch of them so that the beams overlap. I'm not speculating about this. I have them on my sailboat. So do a lot of other folks.

Electrical power on a sailboat is precious. As I mentioned previously, I have a written "electrical budget" that details the draw of every single piece of equipment on the boat, including draw for things like the separate "memory" power lead of the digital am/fm/CD which draws miniscule amounts of power. This draw spec is not from the specs that come with the devices. It is measured at the power source (breaker panel) to take into account all losses inherent in the system.
I know at all times how many amp hours I'm consuming, and how many I'm generatingfrom various sources. I also have to compute how long at how many amps I have to input power to replace used amp hours. It is not a 1:1 ratio. Battery charging is not simply stuffing juice back in to replace the amount used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
salty wrote:

OK, I believe you.

I was speculating. Clearly you know what you're talking about.

Now you've got my curiosity piqued. What do you use to generate power while under way?
--

Regards,
Robert L Bass
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Nov 2009 15:51:58 -0500, "Robert L Bass"

Most of the time the solar panels make up for whatever the sporadic running of the engine doesn't take care of. I'm pretty frugal about using electricity, and I pay attention to my electrical budget out of long established habit. I have all the wiring hookeups needed for connecting to shore power if I am at a dock that has it available, but I've never used it. Just don't need it if you are used to not having unlimited power all the time. I don't have refrigeration or air conditioning, which would be huge consumers of electrical power. If I had them, I would probably have to add a wind generator. Most people with air conditioning can only use it at the dock on shore power, except for very large yachts with dedicated gensets.
Going to all LED's was a very important part of how I manage power usage. Just running the incandesent anchor light for 10 hours every night when it drew 2 amps was a problem. That was 20 amp hours of battery capacity just for that. Now it draws just under .2 amps. for 10 hours which consumes 2 amp hours. Big difference!
At home, I use CFL's everywhere practical, which is almost everywhere. It dropped my electrical usage so much that it qualified me for rebates on my electrical bill on top of the savings from the lower usage itself. I figure my CFL's will mostly be near the end of their service life about the time that LED replacements will be cost effective.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<salty> wrote:

I assume that makes for less problems with galvanic loss of any metal in contact with the water. I've been told (don't know how true it is) that boats comnnected to shore power need some sort of sacrificial anode. True or legend?

Aha! I knew there was a reason I never took up sailing. :^)

Huge. Designing fire alarm systems, we become accustomed to considering every small drain on power because they have to be able to operate on backup battery alone for 24 hours (in some cases 72 hours) and then run all sirens, strobes, etc., for 15 minutes. Every small add-on impacts the battery requirements.

I started using them a while ago and they serve well enough for everything except my PC desks. There I use incandescant lights. Since I work online as much as 12 or 14 hours some days I afford myself the "luxury" of incandescant lighting. I have a number of recessed can fistures in the ceilings, which are 12 and 14 feet high in most of the house. Bulb replacement is a royal PITA with those so any time one goes out it gets a CFL.

We have a pool pump running 8 to 10 hours a day, two freezers, two refrigerators, two central AC systems and, until recently, as many as 5 PC's running for at least 8 hours a day. Somehow I don't hink I'll be able to get a rebate on my FPL bill. Maybe they'll offer me stock in the company though. :^)
--

Regards,
Robert L Bass
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Nov 2009 21:15:14 -0500, "Robert L Bass"

Even boats not connected to shore power need sacrificial anodes.
Sometimes, if there is a problem in a Marina's wiring, serious damage can happen VERY quickly. Imagine what happened if a bronze thruhull gets eaten. Your boat sinks!
It is also possible to be electrocuted swimming near marina docks with shore power issues.

It is exactly what I like about sailing. If I wanted it to be just like home, I could save a lot of money by... staying home!

I'm currently looking into installing a geothermal system for heating and cooling my house. My boiler will be nearing it's expected service life end in about 4 or 5 years. Since I would be paying to replace that at that time anyway, it helps make the numbers work very well. Replacing it earlier would not be nearly as cost effective. What I would pay for a new boiler and central air is about half of the total cost for the geothermal system. Then of course, there are all sorts of rebates, tax credits and "green" programs to cut the cost even further.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com writes:

Umm... you know boats and I don't, but when talking about automotive taillights he's exactly correct.

No... exactly correct for autos.

This I can readily believe -- but that's absolutely not what the automotive "replacements" that try to drop a bunch of LEDs in to replace an 1157 are like.
--
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Nov 2009 17:19:05 -0700, Joe Pfeiffer

Sorry, but he's not

No, not correct for autos.

We are not talking about the cheap chinese 1157 replacements.
I have a car that came from the factory with LED tail light/brake lights. Trust me, they are a lot more visible from any angle then any incandescent tailight you have ever encountered.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com writes:

A taillight engineered around an LED array can work at least as well as incandescents, with all the longevity and energy savings of LEDs. I can also believe in an LED array engineered to fit behind a particular existing lens, which would also work as well, though I've never seen it. But this discussion started (when I brought up the topic) with drop-in retrofits for auto taillights -- ie cheap Chinese 1157 "replacements".
And those fail for all the reasons that have been quoted enough times in this discussion that I snipped them this time.
--
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 21 Nov 2009 19:48:23 -0700, Joe Pfeiffer

If you look around a little more thoroughly, you will find drop in replacements that DO work well.
They exist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Link? I've been waiting for years for someone to recommend a good one and have seen lots of websites and hype but not one person who's been able to say "I used this particular product, and it's as bright as a 1157 and works well."
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LEDs have typically been used where visibilty of the LED unit is required, but for visibilty for the user of the LED they have not proven very economical.
It is important to see the difference in these two usages. An LED for visibilty for other can be flashed on and off and become more visible but for a flashlight, for visibilty for the user (holder) flashing on and off reduces the visibilty.
BTW: LEDs in traffic control lights are typically replaced every two years. The individual units continually burn out with the severe heat and current demand on them. This is also a beacon type usage and requires no light output for illumination purposes.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.