Amana Air Command 80 Gas Fired Furnace (4 blinks) troubleshooting

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On Wed, 30 Jan 2008 17:27:51 GMT, "Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer

Answers: 1) If you didnt have an evaporator coil, you wouldnt have cool air in the hot summer. Its not a weak link. You need to replace filters regularly, use quality filters and make sure there are no gaps in the return ductwork after the filter. If the ductwork is not sealed air tight, the furnace will suck dirty unfiltered air into the furnace. It gets on the motor (causing bearing failure), it gets on the blower wheel (causing reduced air flow) it gets on the secondary heat exchanger (causing reduced air flow) and it gets on the cooling coil (and youve seen first hand what that does and costs. A box of filters and a tube or two of caulk is certainly cheaper than $400 in repairs and whatever extra it has been costing you to run a furnace that wasnt operating efficiently.
2) No, the pads dont last forever. Probably just for the cooling season and then needs to be replaced. Find out from your technician or from
3) As far as the cleaning, it will stay clean now till you let dirt back in. Disenfectant? Probably wont last much longer that a few heating or cooling cycles. But it certainly doesnt hurt to clean and disinfect at the same time. You need to be trained in your spraying technique. It takes 4 years to get it right. :-)
Bubba Calgon's website.
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Yes, that's quite dirty.
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2008 05:53:50 -0700, "Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer

Well, its a shame he didnt check the temp rise. He obviously was too lazy or in a hurry or something. Temperature rise is a range of temperature that your furnace is designed to be used at. Look at the rating plate info inside the furnace. It will probably show 35-65 or 40-70. Measure the temp coming in the furnace return closest to the blower. Measure the temperature coming out of the furnace about a foot away from the supply plenum (where it wont see the radiant heat). The difference between those temperatures should fall within the range listed on the furnace rating plate. Too high (above the 65 or 70) and you risk repeatedly replacing operating controls and heat exchangers. Too Low and the air will feel cold coming out of the registers.
Bubba
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2008 21:00:18 -0500, Bubba wrote:

I'll see if I can check the temp rise. He was only here about an hour, certainly no more ... so I guess he *was* in a hurry! :)
Anyway, the photos I referenced show what it was.
I've got to get back to work but I'll post some photos of the entire unit 'cuz I have some questions about what he did (I didn't watch the whole thing so I wasn't sure but I'm very curious now).
I'll open a separate thread on that.
I thank you, Bubba especially, for taking the time to help out a fellow human being!
Donna
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1) Bubba helps someone 2) See Paris 3) Grand children
Life is nearly complete. One out of three.
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The next step, at least for me. Is to check to see if the furnace is really over heating. I've seen a bad high limit switch. In that case, the furance kept shutting down, but the furnace and the ducts never really did get hot.
So, I'd want someone (maybe the tech, maybe yourself) to see if the duct gets very hot, where the duct comes out of the furnace. If dirty evaporator is the problem, then the top of the furnace will likely be too hot to touch. Most of the high limit switches I've worked on, run about 180 to 200 when they trip off. And that's too hot to put your hand on.
Please go to the furnace and (very carefully) try to touch the grey metal on top of the furnace, where the heat goes to the house. Is it burny hot, luke warm, or room temp? That will tell us a lot. Also feel the top inch or so of the furnace, where it meets with the ducts. Is that burny hot, luke warm, or room temp?
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