Advice on new range

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After a measly 32 years, my range has cratered.
Any rec's for a new one? $500-$700 price range?
Any ones to stay away from?
Thanks a heap, -Zz
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I have an apt bldg and the 50 yr old stuff I dont throw away, I think for 5-700 they are all very poorly made, I have a used appliance dealer that got me a few real nice units worth maybe 6-800 new today for 150 instaled. You dont know what you are getting anymore with china in charge, at least we dont buy chinese milk, and know about chinese kids toys, and chinese dog food. You wont get the quality you now have unless you pay thousands. Just compare price by inflation over 32 years. Get what you like, its all disposable stuff now, Consumers Reports has good ratings on how well they cook, subscribe online.
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Stay away from electric.
Steve
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On 11/20/08 11:24 am SteveB wrote:

Why? My wife was a Home Ec. major in college and has taught Home Ec. She has used both gas and electric ranges over the years and seems perfectly content with her new ceramic-top electric range. We could have had gas run to the kitchen for a gas range (the furnace is gas), but she decided that electric was fine.
Perce
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Unless you have subsidised Hydro you pay alot more to cook, I pay 30% more per Btu for electric. Now Electric companies over the last year has successfully got major rate increases put through that will stay in effect, last I saw Ng is in a big down trend. Cooking on electric, no pro will use electric nor will I. Plus electric electric elements dont last.
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Must be a matter of application and where one is located?
Assuming the OP was asking about ordinary domestic use, where the requiremnts are to cook daily normal , meals for several people, conveniently, quietly and safely without wasting a lot of heat to outside through oven hoods etc.
We also use a microwave for quick heating, re-heating etc. And also the usual appliances, e.g. toaster etc. We do use some propane in a camper trailer, but don't drive that much because of the increased cost of gasoline!
For restaurant/haute-cuisine or celebrity kitchens the requirement could be very different.
Electricity here (95%+ generated by clean hydro) has gone up slightly in cost and now averages ten Canadian cents per kilowatt hour. Approx say 8 to 9 cents US. Or around 4 to 5 pence in the UK. Most here use electricity for home heating also.
Have found that even used electric stoves are low maintenance and with electric there no requirements for bottled gas tanks to be so many feet away from doors or windows of a dwelling etc. etc. or gas delivery problems. (There is not piped in gas here although we produce it (and oil) out from wells on the Newfoundland Grand Banks. It's a tough maritime climate but is a politically stable area of the world; compared to say Nigeria or competing with the Somali pirates. But they'd have to come a long way (Transatlantic) to take over a Canadian oil/gas rig!!!!!!
Also to the point is that huge amounts of electricity are generated further north at Churchill Falls (Named after that UK compatriot of FDR) and some of it is exported via Canada to the northern USA. E.g. New York State.
That production is being greatly increased by another project called The Lower Churchill during next few years so the prospect is that politically stable sources of electricity which is less polluting and foreseeably will remain cheaper, especially when electric vehicles become common, is the way of the future.
Regards.
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"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote:

I'm particularly happy with dual fuel, i.e. gas burners and electric ovens. I'm not sure if there are any available in that price range however. In that price range I've used GE electrics and they've been fine.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Electrics are deficient in the following areas: * They take a while to heat up, * You don't have full control over the heat, * They don't get as hot as a gas range, * They cost more to operate, * You can't tell by looking whether they're on or off, * You don't have the versatility: #You can't toast marshmallows on an electric range. # You can't burn the pin feathers off a freshly-plucked chicken.
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HeyBub wrote:

Electrics do far better at low simmers without burning than gas, except for the high end gas with intermittent burners for simmer. A separate electric cook pot (not crock pot) does an acceptable job of covering for this failing with a gas stove.
Electric ovens are nearly always superior to gas ovens, hence my preference for a dual fuel setup with gas burners and electric ovens.
Operating cost on either type is not a factor unless you are cooking in commercial quantities.
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and they take longer to cool down.
I have electric, but I prefer gas.
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Electrics are deficient in the following areas: * They take a while to heat up, * You don't have full control over the heat, * They don't get as hot as a gas range, * They cost more to operate, * You can't tell by looking whether they're on or off, * You don't have the versatility: #You can't toast marshmallows on an electric range. # You can't burn the pin feathers off a freshly-plucked chicken.
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If it works for you, go for it. I do not like electric. PLUS, electric stoves have more parts and more to go wrong than gas stoves.
Steve
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Oh gee; we have always since 1960 used bog standard 30 inch electrics. Including some intensive catering activities between 1970 and 2003. We are currently on our third or fourth used stove in this 38 year old house. This one and the last having cost nothing. They are fairly easy to repair. Discarded stoves often being free or very cheap as people renovate. Stick to white that colour always seems to be available. Based on experience of friends/neighbours; stainless shows marks very easily and colours such as black can be dull and go out of style quickly. Difficult here, now. to get any new stove that does not use electronic clock/timers which can be a pain and less reliable than the older style. Not a big issue here since our power is very reliable and we are now retired. Keep it simple and reliable. Avoid unnecessary features. Self clean, for example, often doesn't!
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Oh gee, my electric elements lasted 5 years, you can`t have heat control like gas offers, or cook as cheaply. Electric is for those that have no gas or don`t know how to cook. Show me a pro chef restruant that uses electric, and it will be on Kitchen Nightmares show for sure. And you closed your catering business!.
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Show me a pro chef

Enough with the insults ("don't know how to cook"). The difference is that this person is talking about an appliance in his home, not in a restaurant kitchen with industrial ventilation and huge mixers. If you want to get industrial everything in your home, fine... but not everyone does. I don't have a 747 parked in my driveway.
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Who said industrial, what pro uses electric, electric sucks unless boiling water is what you call cooking.
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WHY does it "suck"? Because it doesn't have as fast of response as gas? Ok, it's not the end of the world. It's not that hard to deal with.
By the way, there are pros that use huge electric grill tables. But that alone doesn't mean that you should have one in your home.
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Any poll of profesional chefs will show that they overwhelmingly prefer a gas cooktop. It's not even close. You can get more heat, faster heat, better control, and it's uniform. A common problem with an electric cooktop is that pots and pans are very often not perfectly fat, nor is the electric element. Consequently, one side can be in tigth contact and super hot, while the other is not and cooler.
Give me gas for the cooktop and electric ovens any day.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 10:28:08 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Gas is overwhelmingly superior in all respects for a cooktop except one. Electric is a little better for simmering at a low temperature. That sure isn't enogh to make me want an electric cooktop. I also prefer an electric oven. If I have to have either gas or electric for everything, the answer, without reservation or hesitation, is gas, even if it means having an above ground tank behind the garage.
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On Nov 20, 10:28am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: . You can get more heat,

1. I've never had a problem with inadequate heat with eletric.
2. I've never had a problem with heat uniformity with electric.
3. I've never had a problem with my pans not being flat enough or with improper element mating with electric. I do admit that I don't buy garage sale pans. But neither are they very expensive.
4. I've never had a problem controlling heat with electric. I concede that it is easier to control heat response with gas, but it is simply not that hard to get used to and compensate for electric heat response characteristics.
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If electric cooking is so peechy keen, why do you see the vast majority of pro chefs using gas? Why aren't commerical restaurants outfitted with electric? Ever watch the Food Channel? Count how may different chefs are using gas vs electric. It's overwhelming gas they are using. It ain't even close. And it's because of the above reasons.
How about this survey of pro chefs? 96 percent prefer gas.
http://goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/summary_0199-874923_ITM Description WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- When it comes to results, the majority of professional chefs agree that cooking with gas, whether propane or natural gas, is the best option. According to a recent national survey, 96 percent of professional chefs prefer using a gas cooktop, and nine out of 10 would recommend that others use gas to cook as well.
"I've been in this business for more than 20 years and I don't know of any professional chefs that prefer using electric," said...
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