Adding or moving an electrical outlet


I am installing a projector in my home and I would like to move my existing power outlet about 10 feet. I would like to run the wire behind the wall to keep things looking nice. I am not an electrician, but I have done some basic home electrical work such as replacing outlets and I installed a new dishwasher (where none previously existed) which meant I had to run wires into the basement and manage my circuit breakers.
Essentially, I want to make sure I am not doing something stupid when I:
1. Get a solid wire set (with ground) with enough capacity for the items that will be plugged in (12 or 10 gauge -- bigger is better)
2. Either connect (gang) the new wire to the existing outlet OR remove the old outlet completely and connect the new wiring to the old using screw-on wire connectors. Note that the house is very old, and the existing wiring has a black fabric casing.
3. Run the new wire to the desired location. (Do I need a channel for this?)
4. Connect and install new outlet.
This seems straight forward and simple enough for me to do. However I like my house and I want to prevent fires. Is there anything that I need to keep in mind while doing this, or anything that I should not do?
Thanks,
Jesse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What floor of the house is this on? If first floor, I'd run the new wire down to the basement and back up again. Behind the wall, you're going to run into beams every 16" or whatever it is/was for your old house. Look at the picture on the right, at this link: http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/features/1672/step-by-step-how-to-run-wire-through-a-wall.html The horizontal wire - that's how AC wires are supposed to be run. No way you're going to do that with a 10 foot run, unless you tear down chunks of wall.
Another option is this: "Surface wiring systems can be used to extend electric power from any existing outlet to another location without cutting into walls, floors, or ceilings. Surface wiring systems simplify the process; for one thing, you don't need to fish around for electric wire. They can also be used to conceal and protect existing lamp cords, wires, or cables inside their channels, called raceways." http://www.doityourself.com/stry/installsurfacewiring
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JSz wrote:

Jesse Get a copy of the book "Wiring Simplified" and read it. That will take you three to five evenings. Then come back here and ask any questions it has not answered.
The easiest way to run the cable in a finished room is to run the cable through an adjacent unfinished space. If there is no adjacent unfinished space then remove the baseboard between the two locations. Then remove all of the plaster from behind the baseboard making sure that the reinstalled baseboard will cover all of the opening. Drill holes through the base of the now visible studs to run your cable through. As you will learn in wiring simplified those holes must be at least 1&1/4" from the face of the stud so that the fasteners used to install plaster or trim are unlikely to damage the cable. Install plaster or wood pieces as spacers and reinstall the baseboard. If you have access to unfinished space such as an attic or basement above or below the room in question you can run the cable through the unfinished space and leave the baseboard undisturbed.
Tie the new cable for the circuit extension into the two boxes in accordance with the instructions in the wiring simplified book.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes and yet we aren\'t no blackguards to.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

10 gauge is very difficult to work with for a normal 15A (#14 wire) or 20A (#12 wire) outlet. Stick with normal sizes.

Probably best to connect to the existing outlet. If you do remove it, do not bury it in the wall. It must be accessable for code. You never know when you need another outlet anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Usually the 12 gauge wire is what to use.

Don't remove the existing outlet, just add another outlet. Make sure your connections are tight.

Use Romex. It is designed for in-wall use. You can use surface-mount metal channels if you can't get into the walls.

Make sure you are working with wire that is not live! In fact, cover plates should not be removed unless the power is off.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.