About to buy home with oil tank + gas lines; trying to navigate options??

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wrote:

It's has nothing to do with picking the right real estate agent. As I said, to get advice on a heating system from a real estate agent is like going to an auto mechanic for a tooth ache. A real estate agent isn't qualifed to give opinions of heating systems.
And if that isn't bad enough, most people don't understand that unless you have a buyers agent, who's supposed to be specifically working for you, the real estate agent is actually working for the seller. And even if you have a buyers agent; that agent is typically getting paid from the commission when the house is sold. That is an inherent conflict of interest.

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On Mon, 19 May 2008 11:15:31 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Real estate agents need to be reasonably well versed in all home mechanicals and code related issues because that's an important aspect of their job. Can they take apart a burner head and clean it or diagnose a faulty control board? Not likely, but based on their training and professional experience they're in a better position than most to judge whether a furnace or boiler has been well maintained, is energy efficient and in good working order.

My real estate agent is paid a commission upon the closing of the sale and my lawyer and mortgage broker get their cut as well. She has been rather candid in her advice and understands that by protecting my interests she's also furthering her own. I trust and respect her judgment because she's repeatedly demonstrated her worth; it's as simple as that.

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wrote:

Absolute nonsense. Show me a reference where any of that is included in real estate training courses or licensing exams. The typical real estate agent is a housewife who has zippo experience or training in home mechanicals or code related issues.
Additionally, for them to get involved in giving opinions on any of that is likely precluded by professional ethics and legal issues. If you owned a realty agency, would you want your employees giving opinions on heating systems and structural issues that could get someone killed?
 Can they take apart a burner head and clean it or

Show us a reference where real estate agents receive training in how to determine whether a furnace is well maintained or not. Most are lucky if they can get the type of HVAC right on the listing.

You can trust her all you want. But there is an inherrent conflict of interest. If you're getting paid on a commission, you only get paid if the deal closes. Faced with the prospect of convincing you that the property is worth an additional $5K to meet the sellers price and get the deal done and be paid or tell you it's not worth the extra $5K and starting over, clearly there is motive for the real estate agent to be less than candid.
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On Tue, 20 May 2008 06:05:14 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I refer you to Chapter 16 of: http://www.sauder.ubc.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Bookstore&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID ƒ93

I refer you to Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7 of: http://www.sauder.ubc.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Bookstore&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID ƒ93

A direct quote from another branch of this very same thread:
--- Begin Quote ---
"The right real estate agent can save you a bundle. We had a great agent that pointed out every flaw that she saw in houses that we looked at. Yes, she was acting as our agent and was going to be paid out of the price of the house. She saved us a lot of inspection fees for inspections of houses that "looked ok" to us but not ok to her. We ended up buying a house of lower price but better suited to us."
"She was quite knowledgeable about the heating and electrical systems that we saw in our search for a house. Her estimates for changing furnaces, roofs and electrical upgrades were pretty well on the money for the area that we were looking at. (We made some enquiries ourselves)"
--
Ron P

--- End Quote ---
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The right real estate agent can save you a bundle. We had a great agent that pointed out every flaw that she saw in houses that we looked at. Yes, she was acting as our agent and was going to be paid out of the price of the house. She saved us a lot of inspection fees for inspections of houses that "looked ok" to us but not ok to her. We ended up buying a house of lower price but better suited to us.
She was quite knowledgeable about the heating and electrical systems that we saw in our search for a house. Her estimates for changing furnaces, roofs and electrical upgrades were pretty well on the money for the area that we were looking at. (We made some enquiries ourselves)
--
Ron P

If we are what we eat then: I\'m fast,
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On 5/18/2008 6:18 AM Dairy Godmother spake thus:

First of all, good post and good questions. I wish the so-called "experts" here had as much apparent good sense as you seem to have.
I'll just answer this one question. Unless you're thinking of something completely different, radiators are the ideal local heating device since each one can be turned on or off by means of the inlet valve. (You must make sure, of course, that these valves are working, and may need to replace some.) You simply turn off the radiators in unused spaces.
In general, it seems to me that if you could convert that oil-fired boiler to natural gas, you'd have the ideal combination (gas instead of dirty oil + radiant heat).
Don't forget insulating the house ...
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wrote:

The wrong headed notion that oil is somehow "dirty" is a myth promoted by the gas companies. It's baloney, plain and simple.
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On 5/18/2008 5:42 PM snipped-for-privacy@dog.com spake thus:

OK, pal, I'm ready to read your citations showing it ain't so. Put up or shut up.
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wrote:

Well, you are the one making the false claim that needs a cite. Otherwise it is just as easy and correct to claim that oil is obviously CLEANER than gas. :')
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oil burners can clog pretty easy, gas almost never does
oil often requires more regular service than gas
with enough tanks oil can be bought in advance at lower cost time, like early summer , gas you cant.
my inlawys home has electric baseboard heat, and a totally seperate oil forced air furnace, no doubt installed by a previous owner to save money.he nome is also very well insulated.
the OP question is gone, but i wiill add oil tanks rust from the inside out.
so the exterior can look perfect while the inside is swiss cheese.....
get some HVAC contractors to visit with free estimates.........
if you need AC then a forced air upgrade might be best
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Why does my oil boiler need cleaning once a year or about every 1000 gallons, and my gas boilers never did? Oil fired furnaces tended to be very dirty also, but they have improved.
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wrote:

Hi Edwin,
That's certainly been my experience as well. I expect things will improve considerably if and when we reduce the sulphur content. I've read that ultra low sulphur fuels are vastly better in this regards.
Cheers, Paul
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Having to clean any machine that works as hard as a boiler is no indication that oil is somehow "dirty". If that's at all meaningful, then I guess we have to weigh it against the far more serious problem of gas explosions. That REALLY makes a mess... and kills whole families.
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On 5/19/2008 3:13 AM snipped-for-privacy@dog.com spake thus:

>

That (the possibility of gas explosions) is the one and only advantage of oil over gas.
What are you, a fuel oil dealer?
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 09:58:56 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Yes, and compared to an annual cleaning, it's such a silly, trivial, disadvantage, too.
The gas industry has spread the idiocy about oil being somehow "dirty", when in fact, the homeowner will never encounter any such "dirt". The propaganda tries to fool folks into thinking it will make their homes dirty or smelly. That's complete bullshit.
No, I am not an oil dealer. You, however sound like a snake oil salesman.
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On 5/19/2008 10:03 AM snipped-for-privacy@dog.com spake thus:

It certainly is dirtier in terms of what goes out the exhaust into the air. Natural gas produces (mostly) water vapor and carbon dioxide. Oil produces CO and other crap.
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 10:09:27 -0700, David Nebenzahl

If you look at the total cycle of natural gas from beginning to end, it is no cleaner or less harmful to the environment than oil. In fact, it may be worse.
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On 5/19/2008 10:16 AM snipped-for-privacy@dog.com spake thus:

Now that, my friend, cries out for a cite. Remember, you're the one making the claim, not me.
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 10:21:20 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Do your own homework. If you don't agree with what I said, you can stumble along in ignorance, or you can research and find the truth for yourself.
QED
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"QED"?? Oh grow up.
Any crazy thing can be asserted, with the demand that everyone scramble to disprove it. Therefore, it's up to YOU as the person who made the assertion to provide the evidence.
It's a basic rule of discourse.
Banty
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