>45 deg cut.

My miter saw has +/- 45 deg marks. That is, the max "pointedness" I can get is 45 deg. I need to cut a 1" x 2" with a more pointed cut, say about 60 deg. That is, the angle between the cut and the length should be 60 Deg. (actually about 62 deg but that is a matter of trial and error.)
I have tried to use my table saw without much success.
Is there any way I can use my miter saw to get more pointed cuts? Incidentally I have just learned how to get excellent matching corner cuts for crown molding on my miter saw. I figure there must be a way to get pointed cuts also.
Peter.
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A circular saw can do a good job on that type of cut. I know you didn't ask that, just saying. I have used an adjustable tool support to support the board at the desired angle. That is the only way I know and it's not any better than a circular saw.
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PVR wrote:

As Smitty says, the traditional way is to make an auxiliary angle gauge for the miter gauge. Better than the miter gauge is to make and use a crosscut sled.
By miter saw, you mean a hand miter box or a power miter saw?
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You might want to ask this same question on rec.woodworking
PVR wrote:

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Maybe you could borrow/buy a radial arm saw. There are still a lot of these used on job sites for framing. HTH
joe
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PVR wrote:

For cuts > 45, place the board at 90 deg to the normal direction. That is, to make a 60 degreee cut, set your saw for (90 - 60 =) 30 degrees and place the board 90 degrees to its normal orientation.
Whether your saw will cut the entire distance generated by a 60 degree line is another issue.
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Buy a bundle of tapered door shims, and put several behind the work, secured to backstop with a c-clamp or a bolt (if backstop has holes). You will need to trial-and-error with scrap stock to figure out the right configuration. If you have one of those adjustable push blocks for the table saw, you can use it to rip a single block at 15 degrees, to make your 60 cut. The right-angle approach the other poster described can work for flat stock, if you clamp a square block in the right place to hold the work securely. I wouldn't try it with crown mold.
aem sends...
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wrote:

Next time you are in HD , look in the section with molding/trim, etc. This book has instructions for builing a "fence" for acute angles (p.97).
(book shown on this page)
http://www.compoundmiter.com /
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Get a scrap of 3/4" plywood about a foot by 6 inches or whatever the max width your saw will cut. Set the blade to 60 (30?) degrees and cut the scrap. Set the blade back to 90d and cut the scrap again to form a triangle shaped offcut. This offcut will be a 30-60-90 triangle. Put the triangle against the saw fence with the 30d corner just touching the cut line. Put your workpiece up against the triangle and clamp it down. Compensate for the 30d when you set the saw angle. You will likely have to provide some additional support for the work when using this method.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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get
but
You can change the orientation of the work relative to the fence to increase the angle to the blade but practically there is going to be a limit to what can be cut depending on angle and blade diameter. The easier way in practice is probably to use a circular saw.
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Many great ideas and I shall try most of them.
Many thanks for all the input.
Peter.

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