110 tap off 220 plug?

Page 2 of 2  

Brad wrote:

Many posts seem to indicate that electricians are not electricians.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cc wrote:

They sell plugs that will do just this. I bought one for my Bosch washing machine. 220 plug with the blades turned 90 degrees from normal and a normal 120 for the dryer. It was nice to find because I thought I would have to add a box to get 220 to the new washer.
Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cc wrote:

*If* there is a neutral wire at the 220 outlet, yes you can. You haven't given enough information here to give you a straight answer.
You might have to install a fused outlet to limit the current (see link below) for instance, you want to tap 110V for a washing machine off the 220V dryer outlet if it has 4 wire. It's a really bad solution because you will trip the breaker every time you run the dryer on a high heat cycle and run the washer at the same time.
However, let's say you want to replace an electric range with a gas range, and there is no 110V outlet for the igniter. This might actually make sense -- but if it's only a 3 wire circuit you'll need to convert it to 110V at the breaker box. (You'll end up with a 20A 110V outlet wired with 8 guage wire) If it's a 4-wire range outlet, install something like this next to it and get your electrician friend to tap into one side of the range circuit: http://doitbest.com/DoItBest/Main.aspx?PageIDd&SKUQ1654
It's probably easier and cheaper to just run a new circuit and do it right.
If it's a 220V outlet for an air conditioner, and you are installing a 110V unit, you just replace the receptacle with a 110V and rewire it at the breaker to give one hot and one neutral wire instead of 2 hots. (people do this one all the time)
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's possible to have a 220 socket without a neutral. So, to make 110 you'd have to run another wire back to the socket.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 23:19:31 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

But you DO have a currently unused second hot. Couldn't you use that?
It may even be the right color.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think the OP wanted to be able to use both 120V and 240V. If that's the case, then, no, he couldn't.

Not if the circuit was installed using one of your mythical black & red cables...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.