where are the honey bees?

Page 2 of 2  
micky wrote:

They're not around anymore - because of this:
http://www.dillonchem.com/images/PRODUCT/medium/CDRA2987.JPG
And to make their products more "acceptible" to the public going forward, look for the word "bees" to be removed from these labels, but the words "wasp" and "hornet" will stay. But old pharts will still buy the product to kill anything that makes a nest or hive, regardless how harmless, manageable or beneficial they are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

We haven't had a problem with non-pollination , and I'm for sure not going to crawl around in the woods hand pollinating several dozen blueberry bushes . <<actually , these are low-bush huckleberries>>

The beauty of doing it this way is that the seller does all the really hard work - getting things going . I'll be attending a beekeeping class later this month , but don't expect to have a lot of time invested until time to collect some honey .

There are a lot of local beekeeping orgs around , but nothing says you have to join ... you can probably find all the info you need in an afternoon , print it out for later reference . Gloves , screened hat , smoker , and a couple of small hand tools can all be had for well under a hundred bucks . We decided to get into beekeeping as much for the honey as for the pollination aspect . We have pollinators here , but they don't have the added bonus of hunney ... <<My wife is a big fan of the W the P character Eeyore , and so our place has been named "The 12 Acre Wood" and the house is "Eeyore's Hideaway" ... and so we'll be getting "hunney".>>
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Oh, yeah. I forgot. I like ice cream, cake, icing, cookies, candy, but I don't really like honey. Too sweet and esp. too sticky.
But I'm sure you'll enjoy your project, so that's good.
If nothing goes wrong, I'll post how many cherries I get this year, and if it's low, I'll try to stay home when it flowers next year (18 days after the peak of the cherries at the DC Cherry Blossom Festival, and about 40 miles north of it) and do them all myself. It's a little tree, half within reach and the other half 2 or 3 feet higher.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 May 2014 16:13:29 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I'll look around for some small artists.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Relax, Micky. Adults? Here in AHR? Are you feeding me straight lines again?
It was a homage to a former English professor of mine, James Dickey. Some will remember him as the author who penned "Deliverance" but he also wrote about how farmboys will put their organs of generation in anything they can:
The Sheep Boy
Farm boys wild to couple With anything with soft-wooded trees With mounds of earth. . . .
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/guide/179991
It's really a remarkable poem and 100% Dickey who was by all means larger than life. He wrote another interesting poem calling "Falling" based on an actual event. He had heard a stewardess had fallen out of a plane and wrote about what she might have been thinking on the long, long way down to her death (she undresses - which is a far more common reaction to hyper-stressful situations than people might think - a doctor friend says it's because when people have serious breathing troubles they feel that their clothes, particularly shirts, jackets, etc are too tight and keeping them from breathing - who knows for sure?)

I think that entomologists tag them with a little plastic numbered plaques and a dab of crazy glue. They might object to any award, though. (-:
Glad I could help. Be sure to let us know if it worked. I suspect from what I've read you'll still have cherries but not nearly as many as you might with a health population of bees. FWIW, I was outside working and I saw no shortage of big fat bumblebees working over the Roses of Charon. So it's not only the honeybees out there facilitating fruit tree sex. Soon, you too will be artificial inseminating cherries. Reminds me of an Ag Fair I once covered where this lovely young blonde that looked a lot like Tiger Wood's ex donned this super long plastic glove that looked like a clear opera glove, slicked it with goo and just rammed it right up a cow's rump. What was even more amazing was that the cow was so used to it, it didn't even twitch.
As for those poor honeybees - they get trucked all over the country, exposed to more and different threats than they ever would as a fixed colony. That's why I really suspect neonictinoids as the culprit. The EU ban will precede ours so if their colonies recover and ours are still in collapse we'll have our smoking gun.
Be thankful bee medical research isn't done like human research. The dead bees are scooped up, blended into a puree and the centrifuged out to find out what should be there, what's not, etc.
"Grandpa just died and they're putting him in the NIH cement mixer to see what was wrong with him."
--
Bobby G.







Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

Toulouse-Lautrec has been dead for a long time. Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.wired.com/2014/05/wild-bee-and-butterfly-declines/
But it's not just honeybees that are in trouble. Many wild pollinators-thousands of species of bees and butterflies and moths-are also threatened. Their decline would affect not only our food supply, but our landscapes, too. Most honeybees live in commercially managed agricultural colonies; wild pollinators are caretakers of our everyday surroundings.
"Almost 90 percent of the world's flowering species require insects or other animals for pollination," said ecologist Laura Burkle of Montana State University. "That's a lot of plants that need these adorable creatures for reproduction. And if we don't have those plants, we have a pretty impoverished world."
Compared to honeybees, wild pollinators are not well studied, and their condition has received relatively little public attention. Most people don' t realize that there are thousands of bee species in the United States. Even many butterflies are overlooked, with the plight of just a few species, particularly monarchs, widely recognized.
'Species that used to be in all our yards are dropping out.' Wild bees and butterflies are out on the landscape, making them difficult to count, and a lack of historical baselines makes it challenging to detect long-term trends. Slowly but surely, though, results from field studies and anecdotal reports from experts are piling up. They don't paint a pretty picture. Many pollinator populations seem to be dwindling.
According to a recent survey organized by the Xerces Society, an invertebrate conservation group, nearly one-third of North American bumblebee species are declining. Other studies have reported similar trends, documenting dramatic declines in once-common species such as the American bumblebee. If that's happening to bumblebees, says Xerces Society executive director Scott Black, it's quite possible, even likely, that others are hurting, too.
"There's very little information status on most of the bees other than bumblebees, but if you look at the life histories of these groups, many are likely even more sensitive to the disturbances leading to the declines, such as pesticides and habitat loss," Black said. "Although we don't know what's going on with all bees, I think we could be seeing real problems."
Among other pollinators, iconic monarch butterfly declines are well documented: Their numbers are now at a small fraction of historical levels. And entomologist Art Shapiro of the University of California, Davis spent most of the last four decades counting butterflies across central California, and found declines in every region. These declines don't just involve butterflies that require very specific habitats or food sources, and might be expected to be fragile, but so-called generalist species thought to be highly adaptable. Many other entomologists have told Black the same thing.
"Species that used to be in all our yards are dropping out, but nobody's monitoring them," Black said.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.