Used Lawn Mower Values

I'm wanting to trade my used Lawn-Boy for a new Snapper mower, and in the course of calling the dealers in my area to see if they take trade-ins one dealer told me that they use a "lawn mower blue book" to determine trade-in values. I couldn't find any info on this by Googling. Does anyone know the title of this publication or how I can get some info on used mower values the Web? I'd kinda like to have a clue before I go in to bargain. TIA
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Jerry,
Try this http://tinyurl.com/4nyfs
Jerry Furlong wrote:

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trade-in
the
Here's the guide we use at local Old Time Power gigs: A unit from a quality manufacturer loses 1/2 it's value in 3 years. Those from mass marketing are worth 1/10th their value after 4 years. Everything has a price.
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Srgnt Billko wrote:

OK - my cousin has a 10 year old Sears lawn tractor in her garage - the sucker looks in mint condition. She paid $1500 for it when new, so is it only worth 25% of what she paid for it?
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Basically yep , about $425 or so. If she's lucky she might get about $800 for it if she was to sell it. The resale value largely depends on what new retail prices in your area are, just like with cars, trucks and motorcycles
Snow...
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I sure as hell wouldn't give $800 for a 10-year old Sears lawnmower, even if it was waxed and had new blades.
After 10 years old, even if it runs, she'll be lucky to get more than $200 for it.
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It worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it... ;-) If you wait long enough it will be an antique... look at the old tractors :-)
USENET READER wrote:

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TP wrote:

Exactly. What is the buyer going to use it for, and how much is it worth to them.
Are they buying it for it's parts? How much would they pay for those parts from another source?
Are they buying it so that you'll buy a new mower from them? If so, what's their profit on the sale of the new mower, and will they be able to use or flip the old mower, or will it just be going in the trash?
Or how about scrap value? Will the buyer be taking it apart, and selling the parts for scrap?
Is the buyer going to be using it to cut their grass? How much would they be willing to pay for it after considering their other options?
Are they collecting mowers? Does this one complete a set? Is it a good specimen of a particular brand? The first appearance of a particular feature?
I would tend to think that most buyers will either be interested in a used mower because they can't afford a new one, or they need the parts, or they're going to scrap it. Those things can probably be estimated to some extent, and be published in a "blue book" similar to what's used for cars, but is it really worth it for someone to do that? With all the different models and variations out there, would the cost of the research necessary to produce such a database be something that could ever be recouped by the revenue such a "blue book" would produce? I don't think so.
So I would guess that a dealer of new mowers may be looking to sell a couple of the really nice working mowers to potential future customers of his new mowers (or other power equipment), maybe get a couple of spare parts, scrap the rest, and chalk the rest of what he's willing to pay for the used mower to a selling expense of a new mower. In other words, the dealer will pay what it's worth to him (or less).
Can you find someone who's willing to pay more? Maybe. Maybe not. How long are you willing to wait? Are you willing to spend money to find a buyer? Will that marketing expense cost more than the higher potential sales price?
If there's something special about the mower, such as being the first appearance of a certain feature, and it's in really good condition, it might become a valuable collector's item in your lifetime. Otherwise, if you're going to go after the antique market, you'd better make sure your kids and maybe your grandkids will be willing to store it until it's old enough that collectors will only care about it's age, and not it's uniqueness.
But when push comes to shove, the mower is worth no more than a buyer is willing to pay. And that may or may not have any relationship to what the seller expects it to be worth. It's worth depends a lot on *why* the buyer wants it. That "why" is how the buyer comes up with a price.
Or you could donate it to a charity, and then, to a certain extent, the IRS will let you decide it's value as a tax deductible donation.
--
Warren H.

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Warren wrote:

<snipped the 20 questions routine>
2 words. Lawn service.
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Sears is not considered a "quality" manufacturer - the guideline is for "average use and condition" - if she finds a buyer who likes Craftsman and the thing runs as good as you say it looks she might be able to get $300 for it - but not from me.
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