Leaf shreaders for home owners

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wrote:

Well, I'm quite used to looking strange to my neighbors. That is funny. 20% grass is the key to that I guess. Maybe I'll rig something up. It is 49 degrees here today and raining, so no gardening or much else today. I'm determined not to turn up the heat.
That's funny about your neighbors. You are a trendsetter!
I'll give more thought to this composting. I know what I can do. Two wastebasket type things from the dollar store as large as possible. When it's time to turn it, stir it as best I can and dump it in the other, stir a little more. Find a cover to fit. That ought to work.

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I Love Lucy said:

Yup. As I said, I have three bays to my compost bin. One is nearly almost always empty, and it's used for stirring the other two. One fork at a time from each into the empty bin, usually it stirred quite well. Properly made, it's probably the best thing you can add to garden soil, IMO.
--
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It might work magic on some of my trouble spots. I'll try to get something going, probably in the fall, just throw the fall starter stuff in there and put it in the garage over the winter..
In the meantime, you can FedEx me some of yours. Overnight please, you pay :-).

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wrote:

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Srgnt Billko wrote:

I also put the leaves and bagged grass clippings (grass is rarely bagged) in piles -- no fancy bins and such. But I turn the piles whenever I finish mowing the lawn (only takes 5 minutes). I find that if I don't turn the piles at least once for a long while, many large leaves simply won't decompose and stay there in layer (even after 6 months sitting there), and block water from reaching the bottom layer. I guess this may have something to do with the fact that the tree leaves are large and my garden vacuum doesn't do a good job shredding the large leaves.
After the leaves and grass clippings staying in piles for one year, they are done and I can use the finish products in my vegetable garden or top dressing the lawn. After a couple years doing this, my vegetable garden has turned from sandy to rich soil.
I am currently using a garden vacuum (look like a mower) to suck up the leaves on the lawn and shred the leaves in pieces (not always in small pieces). I would like it better if I had bought the self-propelled model. I would only recommend people to use garden vacuum if they are into composing. If people are not into composing, they are better off using a gas-powered leaf blower or a rake.
Jay Chan
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Yes, the small ones would make a good anchor for a pleasure yacht. Read Sgt Bilko 's reply ( he is right). I have and old bagger mower that I keep around Just to scavenge leaves from our neighbors yards. They will be coarsely chopped when you empty the bags. I then spread them on the ground. Run over them with my muching mower until I get them ground then engaage the bagger and pick them up. I drive to my garden and either mulch my plants or empty the bags in the row and till directly into the soil. I have an MTD 5hp shedder that is five years old and has about three hours on it. Just keeping it in case I need a new engine on my tiller. As a fella told me one time about a piece of equip. "you could'nt melt that thing down and pour it in my yard"
Danny wrote:

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