Replacing a Vent

We're remodeling a room... I'm raising a vent by about 2" inches to make room for wider door casing.
In any event, to do that, I had to take the vent out. It's pretty ugly looking in the throat area (lots of dust collects there, because it's full of ceiling acoustic overspray), and I thought I'd just replace it.
Of course, the local big boxes (HD and Lowe's) don't have anything of the type... So, I was going to find a local supply house... What am I going to ask for?
http://www.capitationservices.com/temp.htm
Thanks.
Eric
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The one of the left is a combination of an elbow and a wall stack boot (can be replaced with a elbow boot).
The one on the right is a wall stack head.
BTW, nice asbestos tape! :-(
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I added some more photos...
The main duct is very close... The elbow and wall stack boot went right into the main duct off-shoot (don't know what that's called - saddle tap, maybe?)
I'm embarrased, because I already put a piece of flex on. I was going to move the vent to the ceiling. But, then I began to do some reading. I realized how complicated a proper HVAC system can be, so I decided it was best to leave the register where it was. I just want to leave enough room for crown molding in the future, and wider door casing now.
I would like to clean-up the sight lines of the wall, and move the register to the ceiling... But, I'm going to assume that the system was designed properly. The only real problem is that because the builder only used a single 2x4 on the door header, the wall stackhead was placed on the 2x4, which basically put the grill right on top of the door casing.
I'm a little concerned that the drywall above the grill cracked, despite there not being a seam there. I wonder where the movement came from that caused the drywall to crack.
In any event...
Should I use a 10x6 wall stackhead, to a straight 6" boot, to an adjustable 90, and maybe use a little bit of 6" galvanized if necessary to get everything lined up?

Thanks for letting me know. I'll try to disturb it as little as possible.
Eric
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into
maybe?)
register
adjustable
Just shorten the flex and install a ceiling grill right in front of where the old wall register was... right behind the can light.
If it's a 6" flex, use a minimum of a 8x8 grill (preferably a 10x10). If it's a 8" flex, use a minimum of a 10x10 grill (preferably a 12x12).
Header across the ceiling joist in front and behind grill. Then cover the top of the 2x4's with a piece of sheet metal. Then cut a hole and install a takeoff, install an elbow then connect your flex. The ceiling grill will screw directly to the drywall (use the plastic EZ screw in anchors for a better grill attachment).
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kj- you fucking hack, you CANNOT use the framing as part of a supply air duct. you need to remember your 'advice' must meet code in all juristictions, not just your backwater hick town. :) And using plastic drywall anchors for installing grills is about the stoopedist hacked-in-shit idea I've ever heard of. If you cant hit the wood framing or the plaster ground onthe ceiling box, there's no reason why you cannot install a small sheet metal angle first to the boot/box/ceiling can with just enough tab for a screw through the grill to engage. A tiny bead of acrylic-latex caulk along the edge where the grill meets the sheet rock can hide mounting surface imperfections.
The OP needs to purchase a 12 x 12 x 8" dia sheet metal CEILING BOX. These come with a plaster ground on all 4 sides & really require framing on only 2 sides. The grill screws into the metal tabs on the plaster ground, or wood. Flex connects to the 8" collar on top.
OP- the card board shit covering your entire duct system is asbestos. That means the metal duct is unsealed as well. You are money ahead of the game if you rip all that old shit out & install anything in its place. At the very least, wrap the existing ducts with 1.5" FSK duct wrap.
A smart thing to do in your home is leave the existing holes in the walls above the doors, convert them to returns, and relocate all supplies to the middle of the rooms or better yet, locate the supplies along the outside walls, above the windows etc.
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boot

to
was
room
2x4,
despite
that
a
Well, I was ASSUMING that this was a return and NOT a supply register!!!

I'm not talking about the little plastic inserts that come with most thermostats! The anchors are only needed IF the grill holes don't match p with the wood headers. This is in case you change the grill direction,so you can NOT see up through the grill from a common area.

Sheet metal can also strip... which leaves you to another alternate idea. Like the one I previously mentioned. :-)
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This is a supply register.
Eric
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Then definately disregard my post... it will NOT be up to code for a supply register!
Sorry about that, I should have asked you... instead of assuming! Shame on me! :-(
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Shame on me for not thinking this through and reading before I dived in!
Thanks to everybody for your help thusfar.
Eric
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If the house is in California, it wont be up to code for return air either !! Bottom line, common plenum returns are verbotten, & that includes panned joist spaces etc.

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Wouldn't that reduce the airflow into the room? I'd have to extend the duct by about 4' to get it closer to the middle of the room.
Wouldn't it blow down, too? Instead of being thrown across the room?
I updated the page to show some potential layouts for the room:
http://www.capitationservices.com/temp.htm
The small circles are recessed lighting. The room is 12' x 9'.
Eric
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lets say the supply duct is 8" . feed that into a 12 x 12 ceiling box. now install a 1, 2, 3, or 4 way blow supply air diffuser. the grill itself imposes a restricition to the air flow, even if it is wide open. If you bought a cheap, residential, stamped face grill the defection is dialed in stone, unless you take your needle nose pliers and bend the louvers. If you purchased a commercial grade, double deflection grill with an OBD, now you can adjust the grill to disperse the air where you want to.
Put the grill in the middle of the room and the fan has to blow the air to the outside wall area. Without a return air in the room, return air is being sucked under the door.
Put the supply grill on the outside wall, and now the conditioned air can flow back th the central return, cooling the whole room, & not just the half from the grill to the source of return.
I'll bet your house is Ca, and if you looked in your tract, every single home has the supply airs immediately above the door when you enter the room. The reason for that is this: the low bidder got the job to do the whole tract, and the only way he could make money was to put in the shortest duct runs possible.
You could put the grill back on the wall where it was, just blank off the last 4" of that stackhead, then cut a new opening the size you want in the stack head, and bend a flange out to attach a piece of plasterground, then sheet rock up to that plasterground.

just for shits & giggles, do a smoke test of the airflow patters (once all the grills are back on. You'll be amazed at what areas never get any conditioned air........

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Thanks for the suggestions.
I decided to replace the duct with rigid.
Took about 4 hours, start to finish. That included a trip to Lowes. It also included adjusting the height on the bridge to clear the new duct. Total cost was about $30, not including the tape, which I had.
Here are a couple of photos:
http://www.capitationservices.com/temp2.htm
Eric
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Sorry... Wrong thread... It's late. I should be in bed.
Eric
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also
It's just me, but I would place a 2x4 across the ends of the bridge to the truss supports on each side.
This would keep it from leaning one way and breaking your bridge. :-)
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Thanks for the thought...
Eric
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