NEED DESIGN HELP FOR TIGHT HOUSE


We are getting ready to do a custom home with 4 Geo systems. Tight Icynene house. We are putting in an ERV, possibly 2. The builder asked me about soemthing I wasn't very sure about. Is there an ERV system that batroom exhausts get fed back into. I have googled and didn't really see anything. I would just be afraid of the mixing of bathroom gasses with make up air.
-- Bob Pietrangelo snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (home) snipped-for-privacy@comfort-solution.biz (work) www.comfort-solution.biz
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We are getting ready to do a custom home with 4 Geo systems. Tight Icynene house. We are putting in an ERV, possibly 2. The builder asked me about soemthing I wasn't very sure about. Is there an ERV system that batroom exhausts get fed back into.
I found some info on piping the Bath exhausts directly into the ERV, does that mean that it no longer gets connected to the return ducting. I am having multiple zones with a common return. I do not understand why you would do this.
I have googled and didn't really see anything. I would just be afraid of the mixing of bathroom gasses with make up air.
-- Bob Pietrangelo snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (home) snipped-for-privacy@comfort-solution.biz (work) www.comfort-solution.biz
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Bob, Check the code books for ventilation and RA ductwork. I seem to remember seeing something about bathrooms not having anything other than a simple fart fan that exhausts to the outside, and/or conditioned air supply. I think it had to do with sanitary issues. I could be wrong.... but it couldn't hurt to double check.
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Well, it might depend on your part of the country. In the hot-humid part, where I live, you really want to exhaust bathroom air straight outside and not try to recover anything from it. The reason being that you don't want that humidity put back into the incoming air stream. So, around here, you'll typically not connect your ERV to the main HVAC, and you won't be putting exhaust vents in bathrooms or other humid locations.
Now, in a cold/dry climate, I can see where you might well want that heat and humidity, so you could make a case for placing ERV exhaust vents in the bathrooms. But, I would think you'd want to make sure your bathroom exhaust goes outside, and let the ERV transfer the heat/humidty to some fresh, incoming outside air.
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<snip>
How do you transfer the humidity?
-zero
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use a dessicant wheel :-)
http://www.advancedbuildings.org/_frames/fr_t_heat_desiccant_cooling.htm
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