EXTENSION CORDS .... any for this purpose?

I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the possibility of getting an air conditioner.
Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort of thing.
Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit? Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
Thanks
DAVID
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David_nj snipped-for-privacy@mailbolt.com writes:

13 amps for 5,000 BTUs is damn inefficient. You should be ablt to find one that pulls half or 2/3 of that.
( 5,000 BTUs at an EER of 10 is 500 watts. That would be 4.5 amps, but the power factor issues raise that a bit).
I'll leave it up to you wheter you're comfortable violating electric code and using an extension cord (they are availale) with a high enough power rating.
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OK... I am not sure about the AMPS. I DO know, reading from this energy guide tag that came with the unit, that it is 5000 BTUs and is rated @ a 9.7 EER. If that means anything.
The thing is, I would need about a 20-25 ft. extension cord. Workable? Or not practical.
Thanks
D.
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David_nj snipped-for-privacy@mailbolt.com writes:

ah, that's more realistic.
5,000 BTUs divide by the EER (9.7) gives you, by definition, the wattage = about 550.
That gives you ... ( 550 watts / 120 volts ) = 5 amps.
Throw in a fudge factor for power factor, so call it 6 amps.
Now.... if you're using something in continuous duty, you should downrate the wiring listing by 20 percent (or, more or less, increase the charted power draw by 20 percent...) so figure that you need wiring rated for at least 8 amps.
You can find extension cords for that at any decent supply house. Again, though, using extension cords, even if properly sized, is frowned upon..

see above.
Note that you'll be pulling about 1/3rd of a typical house circuit by using this. In general, air conditioners should be on their own separate line...
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Workable. Ask for a 14 or 12 gage cord. Expect to pay pretty big, seeing as how the price of copper is way up.
What's preventing you from having a socket put in? Rental unit?
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GodDamned! How much more clear can it be made to you?
It is right in front of you. Read the labels again. Keep reading them until you understand what the hell they are trying to say.
Get rid of your computer. You are one stupid fuck.
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wrote:

I concur.
Please don't ask me how I handled a telemarketer, just today. It was FUN! I pretended to be Miscrosoft. It took the stupid bitch almost two minutes to realize she'd been had. Of course, the call came from India...
I didn't mind her hanging up on me. Let's put it that way...
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-john
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David,
I'm not a HAVC guy... I'm a electrician and controls engineer.
In the last 5 years, I've assisted local Fire Departments in investigating three fatal fires that resulted from the use of extension cords in window AC units.
The problems are the unknowns. Are you going to use a (not inexpensive) 12 gauge extension cord? Can you measure voltage drop at the unit (a major cause of the unit itself overheating and causing a fire). What is the condition of the receptacle, wiring and branch circuit protection of the outlet you plan to plug the thing in to? Is the circuit arc-fault protected?
Extension cords are designed, and manufactured, for intermittent... non-permanent use. The molded plugs and receptacles on them are not made to withstand the constant draw of a HVAC unit... much less the very large current draw when the unit starts.
PLEASE, PLEASE... have a licensed electrician install a dedicated outlet if you want to use this unit.
Jake
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wrote:

That's not the issue. If it's 12/2 w/ground, then no problem, up to 15 or maybe 20 AMPS. 50 to 100 feet. Longer than that, and you have to derate (go up three AWG nos for every time you double the length, or add 100 feet, whichever comes first).
I would recommend #10 AWG for any cord over 100 feet in length, up to 200 feet.
A saller extension cord coud work, but it might get quite warm (hot), and cause too much voltage drop. Withe motor loads, less voltage means more current, and that's BAD.
Don't skimp on exension cords!
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-john
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On 2 Aug 2006 08:34:30 -0700, David_nj snipped-for-privacy@mailbolt.com wrote:

Use #26 (or smaller) wire. Forget that 16 AWG crap. They just want your money.
Bell wire works great, and you get 4 conduvtors per cable. Plus, you collect fire, ho-moaners oe renter's insurance, while you're at it! Go for it, my friend. You have nothing to lose.
And I am the grand-daddy of all liars.
It's my job. What can I say?
SERIOUSLY: Please hire a licensed contractor. I was kidding about the rest, but not about the contractor.
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-john
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As others have said, you would be wise to install an outlet near the AC location. Then there is no concern about tripping over an extension cord, damaging the cord with furniture, somebody tossing a rug over the cord, etc.
However, you can purchase a good quality UL listed, 12/3, 25-foot extension cord for $20. That will handle every one of the 15 amps that your standard household outlet will provide. Why does the Underwriters Laboratory approve the 12/3 25-foot extension cords, rated at 15 amps? Because those experts at testing electrical devices, have determined that the cords (and associated insulation, plug, and socket) safely do what they are supposed to do - provide 15 amps 25 feet away.
Just don't be stupid. Use some common sense and avoid running the cord under a carpet, stapling it to the baseboards, unplugging it while the AC is running, putting it where it could be a tripping hazard, allowing the pet rabbit to gnaw on it, saving money by buying a $5 16 gauge cord at the local outlet store, etc.
There are many, many accidents and fires every year due to extension cord use. There is always a moron user associated with each of those sad situations. That is the reason why there are so many warnings in the owner's manual for any appliance with a reasonable current draw. There is always some moron who needs a simple "don't use an extension cord" because otherwise he's going to use that 90 foot, 2-strand, 32 gauge, 1910 vintage cord that great grandpa left him.
Those warnings must be there for the same reason that we are advised many times in an owner's manual not to use the electric hair dryer will taking a bath or a shower. Etc.
If you still feel a bit concerned, then buy a commercial grade 12/3 25 foot cord for $40-$50. You'll be impressed with the over-engineering that goes into a better quality extension cord.
I'm certain that there is a wealth of advise available from Google on prices, caveats, etc.
One final time: If you are smart and prudent, then extension cords are very safe. If you are dumb or careless, then the gene pools really doesn't need you anyway. :)
Gideon
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