Wildflowers

I have a fenced area beside my shed that is overgrown with weeds and is a really ugly sight! I was wondering...if I use the weedeater on it, and then just sprinkle hundreds of wildflower seeds on the lot, will they grow without having to dig up the whole area before I sprinkle them? It would be a big job to dig up the whole area with a garden claw....
Thanks for any advice:) Angie
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Very few would be likely to survive. Wildflowers need as good a start as 'tame' flowers. Your very best bet would be to spray with Roundup [probably twice]and then scatter your seeds after lightly disturbing the soil. The dead weeds don't need to be removed. You might find ,however, that some of your wildflowers are the same as your weeds!! Your 'weeds' may very well be someone else's wildflowers!! What is a weed?? Best Wishes

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I am sorry, but this simply is not true. Many Texas wildflowers need those weeds to thrive. Using glyphosate is a bad idea for any garden, any time, anywhere. I have thrown wildflower seeds right into huge weed patches to have beautiful wildflowers the following season and it does eventually strangle the weeds out. The larger weeds I pull by hand after a rain, and I'm persistent at it. Disturbing the soil allows weed seeds which may have been dormant in soil for decades, to germinate. Glyphosate has nothing to do with that at all.

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V do you know if Texas Paintbrush, Castilleja indivisa, is one of these? I know most ( if not all) Calif paintbrushes are parasitic upon other plants, such as grasses and Artemisia. I was curious about Texas species of Castilleja??
Emilie NorCal
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On 02 Mar 2004 17:34:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (MLEBLANCA) opined:

Yes, it is. It needs a particular native grass...I'm not sure which. It's actually borderline parasitic in that it really does need companions to thrive. I have mine inter planted with the bluebonnets and since they are legumes and fix nitrogen, I have a nice stand.

Yes, it is the exact same thing...
v
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That is a glorious combination!!
Emilie
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On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 11:11:30 -0600, junkyardcat wrote:

How big is the area?
Established plants will compete for the space and may be too much competition for the seeds when they germinate. Also, seeds need light and moisture. If the established plants become too shady for the seeds, you may have problems.
Prepare the soil right and let your plants be happy. Easiest way to get going: Roundup according to instructions on the bottle. In 3 weeks you can then plant the new seeds.
Depending on what you have now, there will undoubtedly be many volunteer seeds from the previous vegetation. You may have your hands full for a bit.
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