Why up potting?

When repotting plants in containers, one is only supposed to go up a size, and not make a big jump in size. Why? Reading about hostas in containers, I find that a big jump in size will kill the plant. When planted in the ground you are planting it in a huge container.
What I learned is the most important thing to get a container hosta to winter over outside in the north is to keep rain off it when the soil is frozen.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 7/12/2016 1:45 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

When repotting a plant, I use a paring knife or pruning saw -- depending on the size and strength of the roots -- and shave away part of the root ball, both the sides and bottom. I might also cut slits about an inch deep into the root ball from top to bottom in 3 or 4 places around. With new potting mix -- my own home-made mix -- to replace what I removed, I then repot into the old pot.
I recently did a Washingtonian palm and a Dracaena that way. About two months ago, a did a sweet bay. They are all thriving, the Dracaena indoors and the other two outdoors.
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/ .
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On 7/12/2016 3:45 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

It's just an old wive's tale. Putting small plants into much larger containers is the very definition of patio gardening.
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