What does your garden look like now?

Page 2 of 2  


Very small elevated plot is has been inundated by Bermuda grass. I was fighting it all season, gave up a couple months ago. Was self-inflicted. Seeded the exterior border with Bermuda to keep the soil from seeping out the cracks between the timbers. Giving the area back to mother nature seems my only recourse. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

bloom, 3 different colors of Christmas cactus add their hues, as do the hibiscus shrubs. Plenty of oranges still on the tree. But the grass is looking a bit brown with the watering restrictions and the colder weather. (Central Florida)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/07 1:09 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com,

Grumble, I'm coming to visit. Another 10 inches of snow this AM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

how can you tell, it's blowing so much! lee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/07 4:01 PM, in article
wrote:

Because I had to move some of it....
C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looking at my front garden I see Loropetalum, all 8 feet, covered with magenta pink fringe flowers Western Redbud, leafless, but colored with russett-purple seed pods, two titmice are dining on them Viburnum tinus is shiny with metallic tiny blue black berries and beginning to burst its buds into pink white flowers. Camellia Kanjiro whose single rose pink blooms will feed Mrs Anna HB and Ruby crowned Kinglet until late February,
Also still with blooms, Noisette Rose, an old girl, with unknown name. Hellebore is putting up his big ol buds, Erica Furzey rings her tiny pink bells, while Abutilon has a few large pink bells for the Hummers, too.
Holly Fern is loving the cool weather with dark fronds that Contrast with lime Heuchera, daring to put up a stem of buds!
Juniper, Ceanothus, adn Muhlenbergia grasses provide a green texture. And in the bird bath, White Crowned Sparrow takes a dip.
Emilie NorCal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/07 8:47 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@i29g2000prf.googlegroups.com,

C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK just bring the Dandelion book and a quilt. We have a travel trailer you can use for the winter! Em
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/17/07 12:52 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@d4g2000prg.googlegroups.com,

blanket or floss to embellish a quilt! (I've been looking at crazy quilts, I think one is in my future)
C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Dec 2007 06:20:49 -0500, Cheryl Isaak

Sorry to reply so late, I was away on retreat. That said, my garden looks like it will be a lot more empty next spring. At least one can hope. I never, not one time watered the garden this entire year. If it lives, it stays. If it doesn't, so long.
Right now in Austin we still have temps near 70 during the day and assorted from 40 to 60 at night. We must have had a light frost because my tomatoes are fried. The greenhouse is up with the brugs and citrus.
Next spring I really want to be sparse and more plannned. I want to actually see mulch between plants. My garden will be made up of low growing natives, yuccas, succulents, and rocks! The front gardens are so overgrown right now I have no idea what survived under the weeds. I can see cacti and yucca poking through, but not much else. It's all under the weed debris. My neighbors love me, I'm sure. It is really not fair to them.
End of January I have full knee replacement surgery so I can once again wheel myself out and garden. My husband always tells me I am a great planner and planter, but a horrible maintainer of gardens. So, for me, less is more.
V
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/07 10:50 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

approaching.
C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 06:33:33 -0500, Cheryl Isaak
(...)

Well, hopefully the left knee is reacting to the overcompensation of the right leg. For now, I will just get the right knee done and see if the left leg calms down.
Did you do your right knee? If so, what was the "complete" recover period? I know I'm in for some major pain for several months of therapy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I guess you folks know that the knee design replacement for women differs from men. This was new to us as my wife needs one due to a broken knee 40 years ago.
Bill whose garden is 60 F with a high dew point 58. Things are dripping .
Weird
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
"Energy is the only life and is from the Body and Reason is the bound
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would imagine the knees would have to be different based simply on the size of a woman's structure. No matter what size the woman is, I don't think their skeleton is as large as that of a man. Possibly if comparing caucasion women to Asian men, possibly. Not all Asian men, but many are racially smaller.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not just size, it's the position of our femur in our pelvis, it's a different angle than a man's, that's why we have so much trouble with our ACL's. The structural differences are subtle.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/07 10:44 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

under the knee caps and I put a hole in it young. The possibility of replacement has been around for about 25 years - I've just done my exercises and worn proper footwear. I'll make an appointment when winter is over to investigate it.
C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 17:16:50 -0500, Cheryl Isaak

I'm intentionally doing it during winter so I can be out there in the spring (if all goes well). I would be happy just to be able to rake, pull weeds and pile mulch on.
Fortunately, it looks as if my knee cap is okay, but worn. My main problem is from a hyperextension during kneeling which tore a hunk of my miniscus. I let it go for too long and the arthro only cleaned it up. Now I'm crunching around. Now is the time.
BTW, I LOVE physical therapy. It's like getting a great massage twice a week on my legs. My PT is a hot looking broad too! I like beautiful women; what can I say!
The first time they did myofascial release on my legs I knew I was in the right place. It's simply amazing at how much that helps with the pain...and I am in some major pain all the throbbing time now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/07 7:29 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

the snow and ice.

C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.