weed control

Just wondering if anyone has a way to kill/control weeds? I have tried every herbicide they sell at Lowe's and still can't seem to kill the dang things. They always die initially but by the end of the week are alive again.
Do they make "neutralizers" -- sprays that kill everything? And can I spray it and still plant some seedlings in MAy-June?
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On 2/3/2010 3:38 AM, chen wrote:

Have you tried Roundup? It should kill everything, but it might require more than one treatment for woody plants (e.g., shrubs, trees). It is safe to plant in the ground after about a week. Just be sure you thoroughly clean the sprayer before using it for something else.
However, when I say "It should kill everything", I'm beginning to have doubts. Monsanto (the developer of Roundup) has also developed genetically engineered crops that are resistant to Roundup. This allows the use of Roundup to control weeds competing with those crops. It is known that pollen from such crops has spread and contaminated other related crops, making them unfit for export to nations that prohibit the use of genetic engineering in their food supplies. Thus, it is possible that pollen from Roundup-resistent plants has also contaminated related weeds (e.g., wild relatives of grains), making them resistent to Roundup.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Some people like their neighbors and the planet, others don't.
Which are you?
Human and mammalian health effects [edit] Toxicity By 2000, a review published in a Monsanto sponsored journal,[11] conducted by Ian C. Munro (a member of the Cantox scientific and regulatory consulting firm whose role is defined as to "protect client interests while helping our clients achieve milestones and bring products to market"[12]) concluded that "under present and expected conditions of new use, there is no potential for Roundup herbicide to pose a health risk to humans".[13] Monsanto uses that study as the main source to support Roundup safety for humans.[14] A 2008 scientific study has shown that Roundup formulations and metabolic products cause the death of human embryonic, placental, and umbilical cells in vitro, even at low concentrations. The effects were not proportional to the main active ingredient concentrations (glyphosate), but dependent on the nature of the adjuvants used in the Roundup formulation.[15] Deliberate ingestion of Roundup in quantities ranging from 85-200 ml has resulted in death within hours of ingestion, although it has also been ingested in quantities as large as 500ml with only mild or moderate symptoms following ingestion.[16] There is a reasonable correlation between the amount of Roundup ingested and the likelihood of serious systemic sequelae or death. Ingestion of >85 mL of the concentrated formulation is likely to cause significant toxicity in adults. Gastrointestinal corrosive effects, with mouth, throat and epigastric pain and dysphagia are common. Renal and hepatic impairment are also frequent and usually reflect reduced organ perfusion. Respiratory distress, impaired consciousness, pulmonary oedema, infiltration on chest x-ray, shock, arrythmias, renal failure requiring haemodialysis, metabolic acidosis and hyperkalaemia may supervene in severe cases. Bradycardia and ventricular arrhythmias are often present pre-terminally. Dermal exposure to ready-to-use glyphosate formulations can cause irritation, and photo-contact dermatitis has been reported occasionally; these effects are probably due to the preservative Proxel (benzisothiazolin-3-one). Severe skin burns are very rare. Inhalation is a minor route of exposure, but spray mist may cause oral or nasal discomfort, an unpleasant taste in the mouth, tingling and throat irritation. Eye exposure may lead to mild conjunctivitis, and superficial corneal injury is possible if irrigation is delayed or inadequate.[10] [edit] Endocrine disruptor A 2000 in vitro study on mouse MA-10 cells concluded that Roundup inhibited progesterone production by disrupting StAR protein expression.[17] A 2005 in vitro study on human placental JEG3 cells concluded that the glyphosate disruption of aromatase is facilitated by adjuvants of the Roundup formulation.[18] A 2009 in vitro experiment with glyphosate formulations on human liver HepG2 cells has observed endocrine disruption at sub-agricultural doses, where a Roundup formulation showed to be the most active formulation. The effects were more dependent on the formulation than on the glyphosate concentration.[19] A 2009 study on rats has found that Roundup is a potent endocrine disruptor causing disturbances in the reproductive development when the exposure was performed during the puberty period.[20] [edit] Genetic damage A 1998 study on mice concluded that Roundup is able to cause genetic damage. The authors concluded that the damage was "not related to the active ingredient, but to another component of the herbicide mixture".[21] A 2005 study raised concerns over the effects of Roundup in transcription.[22] A 2009 study on mice has found that a single intraperitoneal injection of Roundup in concentration of 25 mg/kg caused chromosomal aberrations and induction of micronuclei.[23] A 2009 in vitro experiment with glyphosate formulations on human liver cells has observed DNA damages at sub-agricultural doses, where a Roundup formulation showed to be the most active formulation. The effects were more dependent on the formulation than on the glyphosate concentration.[19] [edit] Ecologic effects A 2000 review of the toxicological data on Roundup concluded that "for terrestrial uses of Roundup minimal acute and chronic risk was predicted for potentially exposed nontarget organisms". It also concluded that there were some risks to aquatic organisms exposed to Roundup in shallow water.[24] [edit] Toxicity A 2009 study has concluded that while physiological pH decreases glyphosate uptake in animal cells Roundup formulation contains surfactants that increases membrane permeability allowing cellular uptake at physiological pH.[8] [edit] Aquatic effects Fish and aquatic invertebrates are more sensitive to Roundup than terrestrial organisms.[24] Glyphosate is generally less persistent in water than in soil, with 12 to 60 day persistence observed in Canadian pond water, yet persistence of over a year have been observed in the sediments of ponds in Michigan and Oregon.[9] The EU classifies Roundup as R51/53 Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.[25] Although Roundup is not registered for aquatic uses[26] and studies of its effects on amphibians indicate it is toxic to them,[27] scientists have found that it may wind up in small wetlands where tadpoles live, due to inadvertent spraying during its application. A recent study found that even at concentrations one-third of the maximum concentrations expected in nature, Roundup still killed up to 71 percent of tadpoles raised in outdoor tanks.[28] [edit] Environmental degradation and effects When glyphosate comes into contact with the soil, it can be rapidly bound to soil particles and be inactivated.[9] Unbound glyphosate can be degraded by bacteria.[29] Glyphosphate has been shown to increase the infection rate of wheat by fusarium head blight in fields that have been treated with glyphosphate.[30] A 2009 study using a RoundUp formulation has concluded that absorption into plants delays subsequent soil-degradation, and can increase glyphosate persistence in soil from two to six times.[31] In soils, half lives vary from as little as 3 days at a site in Texas, to as much as 141 days at a site in Iowa[32]. In addition, the glyphosate metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid was shown to persist up to 2 years in Swedish forest soils.[33]. A recent study concluded that certain amphibians may be at risk from glyphosate use.[34] One study has shown an effect on growth and survival of earthworms.[35] The results of this study are in conflict with other data, and have been criticized on methodological grounds.[24] In other studies, nitrogen fixing bacteria have been impaired, and also crop plant susceptibility to disease has been increased.[30][36][37][38][39][40][41] [edit] False advertising and scientific fraud [edit] False advertising In 1996, Monsanto was accused of false and misleading advertising of glyphosate products, prompting a law suit by the New York State attorney general.[42] Monsanto had made claims that its spray-on glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup, were safer than table salt and "practically non-toxic" to mammals, birds, and fish.[43] Environmental and consumer rights campaigners brought a case in France in 2001 for presenting Roundup as biodegradable and claiming that it left the soil clean after use; glyphosate, Roundup's main ingredient, is classed by the European Union as "dangerous for the environment" and "toxic for aquatic organisms". In January 2007, Monsanto was convicted of false advertising.[44] The result was confirmed in 2009.[45] [edit] Scientific fraud On two occasions, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has caught scientists deliberately falsifying test results at research laboratories hired by Monsanto to study glyphosate.[46][47][48] In the first incident involving Industrial Biotest Laboratories, an EPA reviewer stated after finding "routine falsification of data" that it was "hard to believe the scientific integrity of the studies when they said they took specimens of the uterus from male rabbits".[49][50][51] In the second incident of falsifying test results in 1991, the owner of the lab (Craven Labs), and three employees were indicted on 20 felony counts, the owner was sentenced to 5 years in prison and fined 50,000 dollars, the lab was fined 15.5 million dollars and ordered to pay 3.7 million dollars in restitution.[32][52][53] Craven laboratories performed studies for 262 pesticide companies including Monsanto. Monsanto has stated that the studies have been repeated, and that Roundup's EPA certification does not now use any studies from Craven Labs or IBT. Monsanto also said that the Craven Labs investigation was started by the EPA after a pesticide industry task force discovered irregularities.[54] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundup#Human_and_mammalian_health_effects
http://healthychild.org/issues/chemical-pop/glyphosate /
http://www.percyschmeiser.com/Toxic.htm
You can also cover the area that you want weeded with newspaper, and put mulch on top of the paper.
Lastly, one man's weed is another man's herb. Find out what you are trying to kill first.
Dandelions, for example, make nutritious salads.
Stinging Nettles are high in A and C vitamins, and iron, as well as being useful in treating asthma. An infusion of the fresh leaves is healing and soothing as a lotion for burns and the root has been shown to have a beneficial effect upon enlarged prostate glands.
Purslane has the highest content of omega3 of any land plant.
And the list goes on and on.
Once having identified one of your weeds, go to http://www.pfaf.org/database/index.php to determine if it can be of use to you.
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"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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So glad you posted this. Monsanto is the most heartless monster you could imagine . Ex: In developing countries, they find a way to keep poor villagers from using their own wells!! Make them buy water! When they can't even feed their children! This was investigated in an issue of Mother Jones several years ago. Beyond shocking! And of course their iron control over seeds is an old scandal. They maneuver farmers into buying their hybrid seed so farmers cannot propagate their own seed and have to keep buying. Feh!
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chen wrote:

If a fancy schmancy lawn there are specific weed control products, otherwise MULCH!

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chen;876470]Just wondering if anyone has a way to kill/control weeds? I have tried every herbicide they sell at Lowe's and still can't seem to kill the dang things. They always die initially but by the end of the week are alive again.
Do they make "neutralizers" -- sprays that kill everything? And can I spray it and still plant some seedlings in MAy-June?
what kind of weeds are they where are they located--sunny or shaded area??? have u tried digging them out and then mulching fairly heavily or have u
tried mulching at all what about putting heat to them by cutting them back and then covering them with heavy black plastic and leaving it there for a few months have u tried this
the more information u can give us chen would be great and maybe we might be able to help u. cyaaaaaaaaaa, sockiescat:)
--
sockiescat

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wrote:

Have you identified the weed in question? Are these weeds in a lawn? Can you pull them out?
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Suspect troll or just plain stupid. People post things like, "I have a car, black with four wheels. What spark plugs should I use?"
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wrote:

Yes they make kill-alls, but that's about all I know about it.
And, if you want one that will kill and go away, that's much harder.
Of course, no matter what you use, weeds will come back, new seeds arrive, sprout, and grow - fast! That's half of what makes them successful weeds! It will be next to impossible to clear an area if there are weeds just a few feet away. In my area, dandelions colonize and grow to significant size in a week or two, no matter what.
If all else fails, how about you dig out a fair patch of soil, mulch it seriously off in a corner somewhere, and refill with clean soil?
--
I was actually going to ask here more about tips and techniques for
hand-weeding, say, while standing up, rather than stooping and pulling
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