Use grass clipping as mulch to keep weeds from growing?

I like the idea of using grass clippings as mulch around my tomatoes, black berries, grapes, and fruit trees. I am just not sure if that is recommended or a good idea? I want to find a cheap way to prevent weeds from growing and keep the ground moist. I heard that the grass clippings can spread disease to the vegetables. My dad found the clipping breeding some kind long centipede insect in the grass.
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I wouldn't use freshly cut grass for mulch. Too much nitrogen. I'd only use decomposed grass for mulch. If nothing else, at least the grass should be old enough to be brown.
scr
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I use straw, its pretty cheap

black
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I use leaves, mostly picked up in bags alongside the road where other fools are throwing them away.
It's free. ;-)
K.
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>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
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I'm in the desert, and I use grass clippings as mulch -- not so much to prevent weeds, but more to keep in moisture so seeds don't dry up before they get established. Without it, there's no getting grass started from seed (grass from turf doesn't root down well enough here).
Let the grass get *thoroughly* dry before using it as mulch -- dry it in the sun, well spread out, turning it occasionally until it is completely crispy. (It will turn brown over time, but that's not critical here.) If there is any moisture left, that will mold and that's not good for your veggies.
Use only a THIN layer -- just enough that you can't quite see the dirt anymore. That way the grass can dry up again after you water it, so it won't mold underneath. The finer the grass is chopped up, the more important this is. LONG grass, once dried, does not tend to mold quite like grass that's been ground up by a lawn mower.
You can also use last year's DRIED dead leaves from northern-type deciduous trees (ash and elm are best) but all the same caveats apply. This has the benefit that it breaks down into the very best of soils (whereas grass, just laying in a pile, takes YEARS to break down). Squish them down to flakes for best results, then mix lightly with the top inch of dirt.
If the mulch tends to get soggy and stay that way, remove it. Some soils just don't work with grass type mulches.
If you don't have ground termites (which we do in the SoCal desert, YMMV), try coarse sawdust instead -- it works better than grass and breaks down into good quality soil over time. I don't mean sawdust like you'd get from a home project (tho you can use that), nor chips (which make things too soggy), but rather the stuff about 1/4" size, about like very small gravel or coarse sand, from the ripping saw pit. Sawmills usually give it away. It also makes a nice ground cover for a dog kennel.
~REZ~
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Grass clippings might grow if there are any nodes... Might make _more_ weeds!
K.
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Katra wrote:

More likely, if you don't cut it frequently enough, it will contain seeds.
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I put news paper down first then grass on top. It's a good way to recycle the old paper.
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tomatoes, black

that is

prevent weeds

vegetables.
insect in the

I've done it, but ended up with lots of grass sprouting after the mulch decomposed.
Bob
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Wouldn't it be better to allow the grass clippings to lie on the lawn and fertilize the grass, and use something else on the garden?
vince norris
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tomatoes, black

weeds
vegetables.
in the

I use grass clippings all the time without incident. The key is to use a layer thick enough to inhibit weeds but not so thick that it decomposes into a slimy mess. About one inch at a time is my recommendation. With this, even freshly cut grass can be used. You'll have to renew it several times over the summer, as grass decomposes. Earthworms love it - when I dig where I've mulched I always find an abundance of earthworms.
Guy Bradley Chesterfield MO zone 6
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tomatoes, black

weeds
vegetables.
in the

I use grass clippings all the time without incident. The key is to use a layer thick enough to inhibit weeds but not so thick that it decomposes into a slimy mess. About one inch at a time is my recommendation. With this, even freshly cut grass can be used. You'll have to renew it several times over the summer, as grass decomposes. Earthworms love it - when I dig where I've mulched I always find an abundance of earthworms.
Guy Bradley Chesterfield MO zone 6
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------030003080700010603060302 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
I have been mulching my garden with fresh grass clippings for over 15 years and never had any problems whatsoever. When I first put them down in the spring, I use about a 4"- 8" layer around everything. By the end of the day, or the end of the next (depending on what time I mow,) the clippings have dried out and the layer has reduced to about half of what it was when fresh. They do not decompose quickly enough to release enough nitrogen to cause burning problems. As the season progresses, I just replace what has decomposed. I have even used them when they were full of weed seeds, such as dandelion, and haven't had any weed problems. They mat down as they dry and hold water in nicely. As far as pests using the clippings for cover or clippings causing diseases, I have not had a problem with either. In my opinion, grass clippings are the perfect mulch...with one caveat:
When using grass clippings is that you don't want to use them from a lawn that has weed killer used on it. The grass will pick up the chemicals and as the clippings decompose in your garden, the chemicals will be left. It would be better to compost clippings that come from a non organic yard so that the chemicals have the chance to break down before being used in your garden.
All that said, I have found that using grass clippings as a mulch varies from gardener to gardener, as the number of postings show. I say try it out on your garden to see if it will work for you. If you have concerns about any damage or pest problems they might cause, experiment in a small section of your garden. After all, isn't experimenting what gardening is all about?
--------------030003080700010603060302 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> <br> <br> I have been mulching my garden with fresh grass clippings for over 15 years and never had any problems whatsoever. When I first put them down in the spring, I use about a 4"- 8" layer around everything. By the end of the day, or the end of the next (depending on what time I mow,) the clippings have dried out and the layer has reduced to about half of what it was when fresh. They do not decompose quickly enough to release enough nitrogen to cause burning problems. As the season progresses, I just replace what has decomposed. I have even used them when they were full of weed seeds, such as dandelion, and haven't had any weed problems. They mat down as they dry and hold water in nicely. As far as pests using the clippings for cover or clippings causing diseases, I have not had a problem with either. In my opinion, grass clippings are the perfect mulch...with one caveat:<br> <br> <u><i><b>When using grass clippings is that you don't want to use them from a lawn that has weed killer used on it. The grass will pick up the chemicals and as the clippings decompose in your garden, the chemicals will be left. It would be better to compost clippings that come from a non organic yard so that the chemicals have the chance to break down before being used in your garden.</b></i></u><br> <br> All that said, I have found that using grass clippings as a mulch varies from gardener to gardener, as the number of postings show. I say try it out on your garden to see if it will work for you. If you have concerns about any damage or pest problems they might cause, experiment in a small section of your garden. After all, isn't experimenting what gardening is all about?<br> </body> </html>
--------------030003080700010603060302--
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