Tomatoes

We've had lots of intentions, this year but all we do is Dr's appointments etc. Is it too late to put out good tomatoes, in the Southeast US? In large pots, of course. Last times we tried, to have gardens the heat humidity and critters pretty much go it. Horses got out and eat the corn from the tassels down to about waist height. I would like have some really good tomatoes again. Everything we have found are not Heirlooms or traditional varieties even those advertised as heirlooms. One thing I figured out is tomatoes, in the stores; the heavier they are, for size, tells you if they are better. The greener picked the lighter they are. Of course it is still comparing cardboard or something to cardboard.
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LilAbner wrote:

I don't know how far south you are, but you should have plenty of time for tomatoes (if you can find transplants) if you plant an early variety, like Early Girl or Stupice. If you can't find healthy transplants, direct-sow some tomato seeds; they grow faster that way than starting them indoors in pots. Sometimes I have volunteer tomato plants catch up to the ones I set out early.
-Bob
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I'm not a big fan of hybrids, but Early Girl has a lot of fans. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Girl>
Dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes have a cult following, and aficionados claim the taste of dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes rival those of the best-regarded heirloom tomatoes [6][7][8][9][10][11].
Dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes are popular in farmers markets in the San Francisco Bay Area. The variety is also popular with home gardeners in that region, where it thrives despite the area's cool and often overcast summers[12][13][14].
Foodies regularly debate the merits of dry-farmed Early Girl tomato farms, such as Ella Bella and Dirty Girl[15]
Chez Panisse founder, and chef Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato, telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Ive ever had was an Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friends house." [16][17]
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I like Stupice too.
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On 7/13/2011 6:45 PM, Billy wrote:

because they were low acid. I didn't prefer them. Any tomato ripened on the vine is better than the shippers we find in the markets. I like a good old acid tomato. They are dandy by themselves, or on a sandwich. they lend a lot to a good hamburger, which is a rarity these days. Don; remember any names. The seed cataloger we use to get up until 15 years ago were filled with variety. Now there are nothing but shippers and a few labeled heirlooms. I would like a good watercress, tomato, green onion and cheese sandwich right now.
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LilAbner wrote:

Marglobe and Rutgers. (Old open-pollinated commercial canning varieties.) They are 80-day tomatoes, and I don't know if you have that long this year because that's 80 days from transplant, and it'll take you another 3 or 4 weeks from seed.
-Bob
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On the other hand, our local nurseries are doing a sale on tomato starts that they haven't sold yet, and some are a foot or more in height. You might want to check-out your local nurseries.
--
- Billy
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