Strawberry fields forever

I had some strawberries growing in a garden at a house I was renting out. One of my tenants had planted them. The were large delicious and spreading themselves quickly. I transplanted several of the to my new house. The first year they did not do much, which I kind of suspected would happen.
This year they took off. First the plants grew tall and had a flower. I saw bees around them and figured they were being pollinated. They stared sending out spreaders which was great. However all the berries are the small tasteless things what we used to call wild strawberries.
What happened to my berries? Can I do anything to save them? If I have to replant new strawberries how do I keep this from happing again?
I posted the above question in a different ng. So far have found the strawberries I now have are called barren strawberries. I still don't know how or why they apparently changed. Any help is appreciated.
Doc
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Barren strawberries is a variety of strawberries, as are wild strawberries and what we call around here alpine strawberries. They don't develop from some other type, nor will they develop into some other type. You will continue to reap what you (or some bird) have sown. Wild strawberries are found everywhere, as their seeds pass through the birds and germinate without being buried. They are an attractive ground cover, but spread everywhere. Some people eat them, but I think most of us prefer one of the larger varieties. If you want eating berries, I would tear out what you have and buy whatever variety you want.
Many states, if not all, have universities with an agriculture specialty, and a web search for strawberries and the name of your state might get you to one of them. They usually list the varieties that do well locally. I seem to recall that they usually recommend buying plants from a good nursery, rather than transplanting something you found, to minimize the chances of importing disease. You will also want to decide if you want an everbearing variety, or a June bearing variety, or the third, which I have forgotten.
Every good garden should have a strawberry patch. Ours have even been spread into the flower beds (the birds, no doubt) and just this week they started ripening and we are rich in sweet berries.
Doc wrote:

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I am only talking about 6 plants. There were no strawberries of any type before I planted these. The ground was tilled before planting and the ground was mounded where they were planted. There weren't any barren berries in the old patch then or now. I could see one maybe two mistakes, but all six? I guess I have no choice but to start over with new plants. Just seems weird to me.

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