small bees in ground

Page 2 of 2  
park the mower right over their nest and leave it running ...
Ingrid
On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 06:42:15 -0400, "Paul E. Lehmann"
they are

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I tried that and it didn't work. The Seven Dust around the hole of a nite will get them when they come ot the next morning. IT WORKS
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 16:03:57 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Mel M Kelly) wrote:

Tried what? Quoted text helps us follow along.
Thanks Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Mower thing. Just use the 7 dust. Don't take much
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 16:08:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Mel M Kelly) wrote:

To which Mower thing do you refer?
A bit of quoted text helps us all follow along.
Charlie.... starting the day with a bit o' David Gilmour (On an Island), a strong cuppa, and a little tomfoolery
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
just a bit of interesting info..if you put wet cigarette tobacco on a bee sting right away it will draw the poison out. im sure it wont work for those of you who are allergic but for the rest of us folks who get stung it really works. hurts like hell when you first put it on but it really does work.
Paul E. Lehmann wrote:

--
Message posted via HomeKB.com
http://www.homekb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/gardens/200707/1
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also, rubbing a bit of raw onion on the sting neutralizes the poison. Still hurts like heck for a while tho.
Seahag
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tinamarieg via HomeKB.com wrote:

Shhh... someone will now sue and hold you accountable because you suggested using a known carcinogen for untested medicinal purposes...
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tinamarieg via HomeKB.com wrote:

round here we use chewing tobacco for it...........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If they are ground bees they are aggressive. Go out of a nite with a light and put some Seven Dust around the hole. It will get them and nor harm harmless honey bees. The ground bees don't come out at nite. I tried everything that didn't work, then I tried the Seven Dust and whamoo.
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mel M Kelly wrote:

Ground bees = yellow jackets? What other kinds of bees make a nest in the ground?
The only bees we have problems with here are the yellow jackets, and the rare bald face hornets. I keep a couple of traps at the edges of my yard, and we have not seen many this year (except for the BFH nest in my apple tree, which I had to remove because of it's proximity to the garden and girls swimming pool). We are, however, moderately infested with paper wasps, honey bees, and bumble bees, and my daughers favorite, the little hover bees (don't know what they are really called). All are welcome in my garden.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
zootal wrote:

Heh...there are over 900 species of digger bees (true bees, not wasps) in N America alone. Some specialize in certain plants (blueberry digger bee for example) can be more efficient in pollinating certain plants than honey bees. Yellow jackets (wasps) will have one localized opening and an entire colony inside. The digger bees will be a solitary nest but along side other digger bees, so 100 female bees would be 100 different nests and holes in the ground. The cicada killer is another ground digging wasp, but unlike YJs they are a solitary nest, but like digger bees what attracts one to nest in an area may attract many others. I would guess what you are calling hover bees are actually Hover Flies, which mimics the look of wasps and bees.
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't speak for wasps, but if you go hunting bees you are far more likely to be bit that if you went about your normal activities and let them be. Small bees may well be stingless, anyway. Most native bees here in Oz are quite small and stingless.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.