Sloped lawn topsoil erosion prevention

I would imagine this is a common issue: What is the best remedy for non-sod sloped lawn having topsoil eroded during heavy rains? I currently only add peat moss to topsoil but it helps only a little. Any tricks of the trade someone wants to share? Thanks Lester
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How about taking steps to thicken your grass? If properly seeded and cared for, you shouldn't be losing soil.
1) How short do you cut the grass? In other words, if there are 5 height settings on your mower, with 1 being the lowest, what do you have it set on?
2) Have you tried overseeding to thicken the lawn?
3) Do you bag lawn clippings, or mulch?

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Lester) wrote:

What is a non-sod lawn? Do you mean you are trying to grow grass seed on a steep place? An established lawn is sod. A new lawn can be made by moving sod or by planting seed. A good lawn will prevent erosion. Until the lawn gets established, you need something else to hold the soil. Peat moss ends to absorb water but it also tends to float.
A grass such as annual rye can germinate quickly and help stabilize soil while a mixture of perennial grasses gets established. A mixture of perennial rye, tall fescue and creeping red fescue works well with the annual rye. Compacted soil is a major contributor to runoff. Aerate if possible, and add organic matter such as compost to promote a healthy stand of grass. Getting grass seed to stay in place on slopes until it germinates can be tough on steeper slopes. A covering of straw can help secure the seed and reduce water runoff. On steep slopes you may need to resort to hydroseeding by a landscape contractor.
Highway departments use hydroseeding. Hydroseeding is a process by which seed, water, fertilizer, fiber mulch, and sometimes lime are blended together in a tank and applied onto a prepared lawn area through a spraying hose. Once sprayed, the wet fiber mulch will help create a bond to the soil and provide the seeds with a water retaining blanketing-coat while protecting it from sunlight, wind, and erosion. As the grass seeds begin to germinate, the fiber mulch will slowly decompose adding nutrients to the soil. Hydroseeding can be very effective for hillsides and sloping lawns to help with erosion control and quick planting. Hydroseeding will typically cost less than planting with sod, but more than regular seeding.
If it is a steep slope, plant low growing groundcovers other than grass. Numerous plants are available that will blanket the ground, protecting it from erosion and remaining neat throughout the year with little or no maintenance. Low growing species of juniper (prostrate juniper) will do well in many sunny, drier locations. They spread rapidly and vary in texture and color from blues to greens. In shady spots, the non-native pachysandra often does well. This plant remains green throughout the winter and spreads easily. Wintercreeper is another non-native but hardy plant that grows in sun and partial shade. Varieties are available that have white or gold variegated leaves. Yet another possibility is periwinkleactually a Vinca speciesknown for its blue or white flowers. Check with a local nursery for species that are best suited for your area. When planting groundcovers on slopes, try to avoid planting into bare soil. This may not be possible with new construction. In this case, mulch around the plants with an organic mulch to help retain water and prevent erosion. If you have existing sod, it is preferable to kill the sod and plant into it. This limits the potential for serious erosion before the new groundcover becomes established. You may want to mulch around the plants so the area looks neat. Providing extra water while establishing your plants greatly enhances success during dry periods.
Terraces provide another option for steep slopes. Terraces provide architectural interest as well as opportunities for extensive gardens. They can vary considerably in cost--depending on the materials used and the area to be terraced. Terraces must be installed properly to ensure the stability of the slope. Check on local ordinances and building codes if considering a terrace.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Lester) wrote in message
If your yard has a sharp slope you may want to look into terracing.
Patrick

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