Simple things that make gardening easier/fun

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Wonder if you folks found something that resonates with the subject. I had trouble for many years ( Don't ask ) with wheelbarrow tires going flat due to cold weather. I finally found this.
<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
And now I can wonder if I should purcase a snow rake for my roof. Always some thing.
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Almost a new topic but now just a tickle.
<http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&ei=Qyh3S4u-NYub8 Aan-bipCg&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&ved AYQBSgA&q=night+soi l&spell=1>
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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Is this some kid of fashion statement? What's a snow rake supposed to do up there? If you're going to take it up there, be sure to attach a brightly colored rope to your door knob, and tie the other end around your waist, so that anyone who is concerned by your absence will be able to find you;O)
Snow? That's that white cottony kind of stuff we put on our Christmas tree, isn't it? (Wildbilly, N. California)

Knightsoil would be ever so much classier.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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On 2/13/2010 8:38 PM, Wildbilly wrote: And now I can wonder if I should purcase a snow rake for my roof.

My roof is calving icebergs onto the deck. Unsafe for wife to fill bird feeder. Where's algore when you need him?
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Frank wrote:

You need to properly insulate your attic... probably no insulation at the perimeter.
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On 2/14/2010 1:47 PM, brooklyn1 wrote:

No it has something to do with the downspouts being frozen and snow melting and refreezing on the roof.
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I've got the same issue Frank but just a lot of small icebergs. My house is insulated for electric heat. Great except moisture can be trapped and rot of facia can occur and has. My concern is the slope of our home is not too steep and a few feet of snow is heavy. The rake I saw had wheels and was designed to gently take off some snow from the ground. The pole was about 20-25 feet long so it required no roof traverse . Things are dripping real good and the water remains outside with temps of about 40 f. Forecast is for a couple more inches tomorrow. I've never seed my garden smashed down like this in 35 years. Bamboo to Kerria Japonica now under snow. Luckily the larger Japanese maples were just pruned by the ice. Our street is covered and one car wide but power stayed on so we are fortunate.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
Big may be better but small can be beautiful.
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On 2/14/2010 3:07 PM, Bill who putters wrote:

About the same here. The icy side is exposed to afternoon sun but would be too high to reach even with a 20 ft. rake as we live on a sloping lot and 2nd story is like a third story. Roof is fairly steep and I don't expect damage. Just never saw so much ice. Couple of white pines have lost large branches due to weight of snow and I think I'll have them removed in the spring. We're probably getting the same snow storm tomorrow. Glad a bought a snow thrower a few years ago. It's getting a workout.
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 14:43:37 -0500, Frank

Downspouts are below the gutters. Ice dams in the gutters can cause water to back up into the soffit where it can freeze and destroy your roof and eaves. You'd be wise to clear your gutters and downspouts before winter and check often during warm weather. Often gutters and spouts are too small to handle the water volume. Ice and icicles form from loss of heat from your house into your attic/eaves... snow melts when sunny and freezes at night, check for insulation, and for proper air circulation too. Do not let this pass, once water begins to run down inside your walls the damage can be horrendously expensive to repair, can even fracture your entire foundation. Your homeowners insurance will not cover water damage from neglect.
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Many times you will do more harm to the shingles on your roof by trying to remove the snow than just leaving it there. My neighbor removed the snow from his roof a couple of years ago to find his roof leaked come spring which involved a roof repair. It may be a different story if you have a weak roof with three feet of snow on it. Then you better get it off and fast. A roof repair come spring is better than no roof at all.........LOL
Rich
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About 35 years ago, when we were both young and gorgeous but more impoverished than we are now, we bought a cheap wheelbarrow that ahd a solid wheel. We still own that wheelbarrow and have never owned another one.
It never occurred to us that wheel barrow tyres went flat until a friend of ours was whinging about how often her tyre was flat and how often she was unable to use the wheelbarrow - a novel concept to us since our barrow has always been available to use.
Last year I wanted to buy a wheelbarrow for the son-in-law so went looking for a wheelbarrow with a solid tyre - no such thing could be found in any nursery or harware shop or in any of the catalogues in these places.
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Builders merchants (real ones, not DIY sheds) sell much more robust ones.
Janet
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 14:52:28 GMT, Janet Baraclough

Contractor wheelbarrows are much too heavy and cumbersome for gardening and under load don't roll easily over earth (tradesmen typically lay down heavy wooden planks for wheelbarrow paths) so they're virtually useless in and about a garden. For moving bulky and light weight items (tools, mulch, etc.) that a typical gardener would a lightweight wheelbarrow or a four wheeled garden cart is far more suitable. Contractor wheelbarrows are even too heavy for most folks when empty. For gardening a 4 cu ft barrow is plenty big enough and one with a plastic tray is even better, easier to clean and no rust. Important safety hint; never leave a wheelbarrow unattended with small children about, wheelbarrows by nature are very unstrable, even an empty one can crush a child, let alone one filled with earth. And never EVER leave any wheelbarrow standing on it's wheel and front lip, it can tip, trap a small child, pet, wild animal. A weelbarrow is not a toy, not something to permit children to play with... there are child's wheelbarrows at toys r us.
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wrote:

We're talking *gardening* here, not builder contracting. Most home gardeners can't handle a fully laden contractors wheelbarrow (certainly the typical female can't - and I'm not being sexist, just stating fact, most guys can't either), nor do they have a place to store it. And contractors don't use wheelbarrows to mix small quantities of cement anymore, they use plastic tubs on the ground, often at the end of the job they toss em in the dumpster... for larger jobs they use a cement mixer. And if I have heavy loads to haul, which I often do, my mommy didn't raise a donkey, I have a garden cart (actually two) that are easier and safer to pull by hand but I typically I haul them with a garden tractor... when I have loads of dirt, sand, anything heavy and in large quantity I use the bucket on my tractor. For the typical homeowner a contractor's wheelbarrow is not only awkward, it's extremely dangerous... for the home gardener it's a stupid thing to own, it'll rarely if ever get used... you are the one full of nonsense... in fact by the nonsense you spewed I don't believe you own any wheelbarrow.
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Many gardeners here make their own paths, walls, ponds, fences, structures.
Most home

I can ( 5 ft 2) and I know many professional gardeners who do.

You're getting desperate now. Most keen gardeners have a shed, or even, a garage, with plenty of space for a wheelbarrow.
And contractors don't use wheelbarrows to mix small

LOL, I know many gardeners who own or rent a cement mixer. They use the barrow to move the cement they made in the mixer.
And if I have heavy loads to haul,

How does she feel about the ass?
anything heavy and in large quantity I use the bucket on

Gardeners who have no room to store a wheelbarrow (according to you) are even less likely to own a tractor.
Janet
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I just love a good gardening discussion with its' information, snappy banter, invectives, biting, and gouging. But first, I really need some popcorn. Good show guys ;O)
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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In article

Aw, dang. I gotta big bowl of pop corn an' nothins' happenin'. Rats.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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That's exactly what we do. Hardly rocket science, is it?
Our kind of gardening often involves moving heavy building materials. Contractor barrows are far better ergonomically designed so even with a heavy load they can be easier to use than a lightweight plastic one overflowing with Sheldon's manure.

Yep.
Janet
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 11:45:18 GMT, Janet Baraclough

You must be built like Powerful Katrinka. LOL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLrG_1g2Cys

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wrote:

For those sorts of jobs, I've found that the sort of trolley that removalists use works for me. I have trouble balancing a wheel barrow laden with a lot of heavy materials but the 2 wheels of the removalists type trolley seem to be better for me and mean that I can manage and manage well. Luckily it's usually bone dry and hard ground here as I know I couldn't use it in soft ground.
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