Shrubbery

I would like to plant fast growing shrubs that can act as a screen (need to be upwards of 6 feet high). They will be planted in a shady, wooded area with virtually no direct sunlight. I live in Zone 5.
Any suggestions on shrubbery that will meet the specified criteria?
Thanks.........
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Hmmm....we need more data than that!
Like, well, must we cut it with a herring?
<grin> Sorry, couldn't help it...
Oh, and will it be chewed upon by Llamas? Also also very important...Visited by swallows maybe? I mean, not African swallows because they are non migratory you know...
:>)
John

shady,
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snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net (Arcee) wrote:

This is partly just a guess because I garden in a mellower climate than Zone 5, but I think Hydrangea serrata hybrids will do great for you, flowering gorgeously in partial shade & growing quite big (eight by eight feet). You might mix in with them some flowering currants. These are deciduous so less of a screen in winter.
Several types of viburnum would do well in your zone, possibly Arrow-wood Viburnum for zone 5, but check your own nurseries to see what kinds of viburnums are popular for your area. American Witchhazel might be appropriate; slow growing, but if you get five or six foot tall potted specimens, they won't be terribly expensive.
For something evergreen, leatherleaf mahonia can grow upright to six feet or taller, does well in semi-shade with bright yellow flowers & edible berries, but it can be slow-growing in the shade & to have big ones may require investing in them already substantial in size. The other shade-oriented evergreen choice is apt to be some kind of yew, again slow-growing so to get a screen out of them means looking for upright varieties already substantial in size.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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(Arcee) wrote:

Some good suggestions, but few of these plants will be hardy in zone 5 ( I know, paggers - it's hard to make that transition from our mild zone 8). Hydrangea macrophylla is borderline in zone 6 and serratas are often less hardy. Leatherleaf mahonia is also a zone 6 plant....in fact there are very few evergreen shade tolerant shrubs for zone 5. And too much shade is not to the liking of many deciduous viburnums and one will not get the blooming potential from flowering plants grown in much shade.
Ribes could do the trick but the most common flowering currants (R. sanguineum) are west coast natives and although hardy, are uncommon in the east. Ribes odoratum will be more likely to be present in area nurseries. Kerria japonica will grow in almost complete shade but may not flower heavily. But it is a pretty rapid grower.
For evergreen screening in shade in your zone, yews are the plant of choice, but as paghat mentioned these are NOT fast growing - buy the largest you can find/afford.
pam - gardengal
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in article snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com, Arcee at snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net wrote on 8/31/04 4:07 PM:

I am also in zone 5, and with the same conditions that you mention. I planted a privet (ligustrum ibolium) hedge in my wooded garden , spacing the plants about 2 feet apart, and left it unpruned. It reached about 10' in just a few years. It has no insect pests or diseases, and is easily grown from cuttings. The birds like the black berries, and it does well with no direct sun, just dappled shade from the tall maples and beeches.
Mahonia aquifolium also does well in the woodland, but it only reaches about 3 feet in height in deeper shade.
Linda in Central NY zone 5
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wrote on 8/31/04 4:07 PM:

Thanks to those who offered straight forward, intelligent answers. Seems John T. What'shisname and Dee seemed to have missed out on the intelligent part.
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wrote on 8/31/04 4:07 PM:

Is there a "best" time for planting ligustrum ibolium or can it be planted any time, spring throught fall?
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