shasta daisies

hello,
we're considering putting some shasta daisies up in front of the house. however, we're unsure how much sun they need. the area gets morning sun up until about 1pm. is this enough? if not, can someone recommend another prolific flowering plant that can thrive in this environment (2ft+)? we're in zone 7.
thanks!
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Shastas will do fine in that kind of light. As far as others, there are too many to mention. OK - I'll add one: Daylillies.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That should be enough sun. Mine only get afternoon sun and they do very well and I am in zone-6.
My comments: o They need room. Like 3-ft diameter for each plant should be OK. o They die back all the way to the ground in winter. There is no winter interest. o I don't like their leaf shape. Too weed-like for my taste.
I prefer hydrangea better. The leaves in a hydrangea looks MUCH better than those in a shasta daisy. Its dry branches provide some winter interest. Hydrangea needs even more room than shasta daisy though -- something like 4-ft to 5-ft diameter of space. We can easily propagate hydrangea by using cuttings if you like it so much that you want to plant it all over your garden.
Hope this helps.
Jay Chan
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thanks for the responses. has anyone ever tried growing them from seeds? are they relatively fast growing? (e.g. can i expect them to bloom this season if i were to plant the seeds now?)
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Not hard to grow from seed, but I've never seen flowers until the 2nd season. How many plants do you want to end up with?
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I would expect on the order of 15-20 of them. they'll be sandwich between the house and some yews we just planted.
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Well, unless you can get a hot deal on that quantity of year-old plants from a local nursery, seeds are the way to go. Even with plants, they'll be a little light on the flowers during the first year. After that, you'll be inundated.
Another thought: They're nice plants, and almost impossible to kill once they're established. But, on a 1 to 10 scale of "interesting", I'd say they're a 6. Every garden needs some plants which don't need a lot of coddling, and that's one reason for having some shastas. But...15-20 might be overkill. There are so many other things that'll grow under those same conditions. Why not mix in some others?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes, they are very easy to grow from seeds. Mine all grow from seeds.
But I didn't know that. I only wanted four. But I planted many just in case they didn't grow well. I ended up getting way too many, and had to plant the extras in place that I didn't plan to.
If I remember correctly, they didn't bloom in the first year.
Jay Chan
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You're supposed to stop total strangers walking past your house and just stick extra plants in their hands and then run away. :)
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Hi, So I take it it I should not of planted a package of seeds into 3 little pots hoping for a nice slightly rounded potted plant to plant outside but instead of used just one seed per pot? I figured I would get one flower from one seed and wanted something bushy
:) lynn
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wrote:

Lynn, didn't you read the instructions on the packet??? Unless you have seeds which you KNOW have a very high germination rate, or are very large, you plant two per pot. If both seeds sprout, you wait a few days and then pinch off one of them.
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LOL apparently not till now, I totally missed the seed spacing on the instructions. :) lynn
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Lynn wrote:

I figure you are joking. Anyway, I normally plant 3 seeds in each pots, and only keep the strongest one.
My impression of shasta daisies is that they are not bushy. They are kind of wild, leggy, and leave a hole in the middle of the plant.
Jay Chan
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When the center of the clump looks empty, you dig it up, cut the outer rim into 2 or more pieces, and replant them. Same with daylillies, although those usually require high explosives to pry into pieces.
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