Rose of Sharron Transplant

I have 2 pretty big Rose of Sharron plants I would like to move. They are over 5 feet tall and have been the ground about 5 years. Can I get enough of the root structure to move them or will I just kill them? Also when would be the best time to do this, I am assuming before they leaf in the spring? Thanks in advance for and advice. MJ
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I don't really know, and this is not at all scientific, but I have a Rose of Sharon that is at least 15 years old that I've cut back to within a couple of feet of the ground 3 or 4 times... and it springs back with astounding vigor every time. The thing seems to be unkillable! If I ever needed to move it, I wouldn't hesitate.
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mj;976459 Wrote: > I have 2 pretty big Rose of Sharron plants I would like to move. They > are over 5 feet tall and have been the ground about 5 years. Can I get > enough of the root structure to move them or will I just kill them? Also > when would be the best time to do this, I am assuming before they leaf > in the spring? Thanks in advance for and advice.

When you say Rose of Sharon, do you mean Hypericum calcynum (multi-stemmed, yellow flowers) or Hibuscus syriacus (various coloured flowers, often pink or blue or white or mauve, but certainly not yellow, usually single stemmed)? Because both are commonly called RoS and are quite different plants.
If you mean the Hypericum, then it is close to impossible to kill, and the plant tends to regrow very easily from root fragments. Dig a bit up and shove it it in somewhere, anytime, anywhere, and you will have as many new plants as you like. You'll have difficulty stopping it growing where it originally was unless you apply strong weedkillers.
If you mean the Hibiscus, then smaller plants can be moved fairly easily, best time is in spring, and prune them first. Larger plants have a large rootball that will require mechanical assistence to dig up/move, and are slow to recover. An alternative approach to moving a large plant might be to take cuttings (research how/when best to do this), propagate new plants from the cuttings for the new locations, and dispose of the old plants when the new ones are established.
--
echinosum


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On Friday, January 11, 2013 5:16:47 PM UTC-5, mj wrote:

It is the Hibiscus Type. The reason for the transplant is because I originally put them in the vegetable garden street side kind of as a block. 7 year later I want the space back. My current thoughts are to just cut it was back and leave them right where they are. Thanks Everyone, MJ
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