Rooting aloe vera plants

While there is some information about this on the internet, a search through the garden groups here...
"aloe vera" rooting group:*.garden.*
turned up nothing. Alot turns up on a web search, though.
Specifically seeking details on rooting aloe vera plants and appreciate any help and comments.
Thanks.
Jim Carlock Post replies to the group.
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Jim Carlock wrote:

I don't mess with aloe vera Jim but DW just pokes a hole in a pot full of soil and sticks the lower end of a leaf in it. Keeps it damp until it roots. Generally in several days it will be rooted. Of course she has a green thumb clear up to her elbow so your chances may vary.
George
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If you just let the plant go there will be lettle ones come up all around it. We just put ours outside in the summer and it goes nuts. We give the little one to friends.
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
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I'd put at least 1/3 of the stalk under the ground. This will give you deep roots. Water every 2-3 days so the soil is moist (like a squeezed sponge). After a month, cut back to weekly watering. The leaves will probably shrivel a bit as the plant forms roots: it is living off the stored energy in its leaves. This is normal. Resist the temptation to over water. If they sit in water they'll get rot; which turns them brownish and shriveled.
Aloe want heat and light. Indoors they can take sun on a windowsill. Outdoors they can take sun to light shade. One or two hours of direct sun is usually their limit here in California. They will turn orange if they are getting too much sun. Brown, scabby spots are sunburn. Aloe are hardy to about 40 degrees. Mine have overhead protection on my patio and have survived a light frost. Drop by my website at http://www.thegardenpages.com for more aloe and succulent info.
Hope this helps, good luck!
Jim Carlock wrote:

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Take a leaf cutting, about 6" works for me. Let it sit a day or so until the cut end goes hard and seals up. Place it half it's length deep into sharp sand which is kept barely moist, I like to use a terra cotta pot set on a terra cotta saucer and that saucer standing in water in another saucer. In a month or more you will get an offset that becomes your new plant.
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wrote:

Use a sharp knife to take a cutting. Allow the cut to heal for 2 days, bright light, no sun. Put 1" of gravel in a tall glass, place in bright light, and keep water level below the gravel. I've rooted many succulent and cactus plants this way.
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Good advise, remember when planting on that a well drained compost mix is a good idea (IMO)
JW

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