Reverse-cycle a/c in greenhouse?

I am restoring a 15 x 10 ft. greenhouse in north FL--twinwall polycarbonate on aluminum frame set on a 3-foot wall. GH is attached to a small concrete block shed. It will have two exhaust fans, ceiling fan, 4 vents in the wall, possibly a louvered window in the door to the shed.
Most people seem to use fans in summer, heaters in winter. I have not read much about air conditioners in greenhouses and wonder why. Outrageous electric bills? I am considering installing an electric reverse-cycle air conditioner/heater in the GH wall. Is this sensible/practical? Thanks. T-L
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Do a search on evaporative cooling systems for southern greenhouses. I have used them in the past with great success.
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Fans are better than AC because they are cheaper to run and also ventillate the greenhouse. Growing plants use up the carbon dioxide in the air, so you need to plan a way to replenish it. Fans are the most popular method, but you could also use an alcohol lamp, compressed CO2, or live animals to provide for your plants. (Caution: too much CO2 is toxic to both plants and animals.)
For the guy who suggested an evaporative cooler, I think FL is too humid for that. But I've been wrong before.
-- spud_demon -at- thundermaker.net The above may not (yet) represent the opinions of my employer.
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Won't an air conditioner also act as a dehumidifier? I think most plants would like the extra water. I'm not sure what you mean by reverse cycle. But the main reason is probably $$$$.
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I had thought reverse cycle meant both cooling and heating, but I could be wrong.
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