(re- post )emerald green arborvitae

I don't know why, but google attached my first post (from the 12th) to a thread from 1997. Go figuire. I reposted below. Thanks in a advance.
Original post:
I planted eleven emerald green arborvitae (evergreens) 2 months ago and used pure peat moss (along with some dog turds) as backfill for the rootball. They're each about two feet tall. I have kept up on keeping them watered, they are watered at least six days a week. I live in Pittsburgh.
My question: I have two seventy pound dogs, and have taken the habit of tossing their poop at the mounds around the rootballs. Is this a bad idea? I would expect it to fertilize them, but can it fertilize them too much? Each tree is getting about three turds a week at this rate.
I'm sorry if this seems like a silly question, but their urine (females) kills my grass, so I was worried about the same effect on my new trees.
Any helpful hint would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Mike
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Mike) wrote in message

I don't think peat moss + turds is a good idea. Water six days a week is too much.

I think arborvitae likes acid soil. Urine and uncomposted turds are not good.
Not an expert. But I think you're killing your trees slowly with good intention.
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intention.
I'd agree. Peat moss is not highly recommended as a soil amendment - it is an unrenewable resource, adds very limited nutritive value and holds too much mositure, specially when used as the only backfill. Current horticultural practice is to backfill with only native soil, or in lieu of that, amend the entire planting bed rather than individual planting holes. Watering 6 days a week is overkill, specially in the fall and winter when rainfall tends to be more plentiful. A deep soaking once a week or every 10 days to 2 weeks is sufficient is rainfall is scanty.
And using uncomposted animal waste, specially from carnivores, is never a wise idea. In addition to aesthetic and sanitary concerns, you run the risk of burning the plants with too much nitrogen. A good composted organic mulch is much more advisable.
pam - gardengal
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