Question about using mulch in wintertime (S.Calif)

I've started using mulch around the base of all my fruit trees this year, I live in a hot summer area and I'm trying to keep the roots as cool as possible (not to mention the other benefits of mulch), but since I have some trees that will grow in the winter time (mainly citrus) I wonder if pulling back(only for the winter months) the mulch would help warm up the ground beneath them and they might benefit more from this than from the mulch. These are young dwarf citrus trees I'm speaking of. The mulch is about 2-3 inches thick and I'm planning on adding to it next spring.
jc
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Jc
Good question
Do not pull the mulch away unless it is touching the trunk. Mulch should be at least 6" from the stump and flat at 3-4" thick. Micros are active in winter and will interact with the mulch at times. Again, I suggest not removing the mulch unless it is fresh chips or is improperly installed.
Just a reminder on mulching. Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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BTW
Pruning correctly and other treatments done are best if done correctly.
Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case Sensitive.
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Unhealthy Trees from the Nursery / Improper Planting http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub1.html and Look up "Tree Planting" http://www.treedictionary.com
Improper Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
Improper Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Improper Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Tree Farming and Related Problems http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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On 9/18/2007 1:06 AM, jbclem wrote:

It depends on the type of mulch.
I use the leaves that fall from my large deciduous trees: "evergreen" ash, valley white oak, zelkova, and liquidambar. I use these as a mulch in all my beds. I put down so many leaves that they smother the weeds but not enough to smother the low-growing plants that I want. I also let the leaves from my peach tree stay where they fall.
The mulch stays in place year-round. In the winter, the mulch breaks the force of the rain (if we get any). Eventually, it decomposes and enriches the soil.
I also mulched my front lawn, where I was trying to establish a ground cover. This past January, that mulch was the only thing that kept the ground cover from dying during the "great freeze of '07".
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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