prepairing hydrangeas to move

Live near Chicago. I bought two hydrangeas plants and put them in big pots next to my front stairs. Sun till noon.
I'd like to plant them into the ground so they come back in spring. Can I do this? How should I do this? They are doing well in these big planter pots, but far too heavy to move.
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In the order you asked:
1) Yes, you can do this. Hydrangeas belong in the ground.
2) How? http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/trees/430-295/430-295.html http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/lw_landscaping_mulching/article/0,2029,DIY_14136_2276146,00.html
3) Too heavy to move? You'll have to move them at least a little to plant them in the ground. Teenagers usually consider themselves impoverished. Hire one as extra muscle. Hydrangeas are pretty tough plants, but if yours are too heavy for you to manage, you'll rough them up trying to do it yourself.
Be sure you really want the plants in whatever spots you choose. They can grow quite large, wide tough, wide-ranging thick roots. Removing them can be a real bitch. Also, get a soil test kit from a garden center and check the pH. They like acid soil, and will produce nicer colored flowers when the pH is correct. The wrong pH generally won't kill them, but the flowers and leaves will look pretty blah.
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thank you. I was hoping you'd saw that and by 'too heavy' I mean the pots where too heavy to move inside if the cold was an issue.

http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/lw_landscaping_mulching/article/0,2029,DIY_14136_2276146,00.html
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Cold *could* be an issue with pots, even for plants that will survive horrendous winters in the ground. You definitely want to get them out of the pots before winter, and this is a perfect time of year to do it. Just follow planting instructions, and do NOT be cheap when it comes to preparing the hole with composted manure. The plants are going to live in those holes for a long time. You need to give them a good start.

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thanks for your reply They went into the ground this morning. I had composted manure in the pot and also had extra that I put into the hole.
Also a good sprinkling of 'Vigiro' acid loving plant food. I usually have a 'brown' thumb....so will hope for the best.

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Don't do anything that might cause new growth at this time. It might be damaged by frost. Once these plants are established, they're usually tough as nails. But, not now.

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