"Pinching" buds to promote further growth

How precisely, is this done? I keep reading about this, but not sure I understand what is being suggested. Are you to just pinch new buds once, multiple times, ...? How hard are you to pinch these things anyway? Enough to slightly crush them, or less?
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I'm sorry, but this has got to be the most hilarious post I have read in a looooong time.

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In case you weren't being a jokester, "pinch" means to remove. So you remove buds from chrysanthemums early in the season so that the plant bushes out and blooms later. Usually you remove each bud with you fingers so that you don't just shear the plant and ruin its shape.
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bushes
that
Now that we've gotten this far:
You pinch so there's maybe 1/8 to 1/4" of stem above the next lower set of leaves. Or, if the plant needs more of a trim, go lower, but don't leave a long piece of stem. Most plants won't grow new leaves from the stub. Don't remove too many leaves at once from plants that are stressed for some reason, such as lack of water, physical damage, etc.
For plants whose growth is brittle and you're afraid to stick your hand among the stems, pick up a pair of florist's scissors. They have very short cutting blades made for small places. Keep the scissors closed as you insert them into the growth, and open them when you're near the stem you want to cut. If you can't find these scissors in stores, get a pair of Joyce Chen kitchen scissors at a supermarket, Bed Bath & Beyond, Linens & Things - that sort of place. They work fine and because they're made to cut through chicken bones, they'll handle tough branches, too.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 16:46:49 -0400, "Carolyn LeCrone"

Whoever first used "pinch" or "pinch back" has a lot to answer for. Would it be clearer if it were called "tip pruning"? Still, "pinch" implies, helpfully, that in many cases, tender new growth at the tip of branches can be 'snipped' off with the fingernails.
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Actually I wasn't kidding with you. But I understand where the humor lies. Is this done for all plants? Herbs, flowers, et cet.?

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Some, but not all. You have to sit quietly and look at the particular plant's growth habit. It's good to use an example that's BIG and EASY to understand: Corn. New growth comes from whorls in the center. You wouldn't "pinch" corn.
Become a fixture at your public library. If you're not falling asleep with a plant book on your lap at least two nights a week, you're not worthy of plant nirvana yet. :-) You should have at least $20 in overdue book fees each month.

bushes
that
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (Max Caviar) wrote in message

Well you gotta start somewhere. The term "Green Thumb" comes from pinching buds and foliage between thumbnail and forefinger to remove them. What you do are doing is breaking apical dominance, a mouthfull that means the bud you remove was keeping the buds below it from fully developing. That's why pinching back makes the plant fuller, those lower buds wake up and grow. If you have hoochie nails or some reason not to have sap stained fingers use shears.
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snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com (Beecrofter) wrote:

There is a technique some refer to as "pinching" which does not involve removing buds or growing tips. It is done during vegetative growth to promote shorter internodes and beefier stems in order to support larger flower mass at maturity. The internodes nearest apical meristems are squeezed between thumb and forefinger enough to mildly crush and bruise them, but not so hard as to cause the growing tip to die. Another method of beefing up stems during vegetative growth is to twist the internodes such that the phloem is sheared away from the xylem, and the plants respond by reducing internodal length and fattening the traumatized stems. These techniques are predominately used by cannabis culturists, but are also used for increasing yields from some fruit trees and presumably can be used on many species for various purposes.
Do a google search on "supercropping" and you will find plenty of variations on the techniques of "pinching".
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interesting stuff, thank you people
been employing some of the info in my own garden and it seems to be working fine, guess i'll really be able to tell in spring (hurry up already!)
snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (Max Caviar) wrote in message

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