Newbie Question- English Garden

Hello all- I'm interested in planting an English Garden for my wife on the side of our house. I live in New Jersey and the side of my home gets about Sun about 1/2 of the day.
Here are some of the plants I've been looking at- Yarrow (comes in a variety of colours) Hollyhock( again,a vaiety to choose from) Lady's Mantle Boltonia Snow in Summer Perennial flax Delphinium "Pacific Hybrids" Dianthus Bellflower Foxglove Lavender Candytuft Shasta Daisy Lupin Canterbury Bells Peony Sea Thrift Forget-Me-Not Siberian Iris Fairy Thimble
Question-- what's the best place to buy perennials? can you do it on-line?
- is it too late in the season to plant these??
Thanks, Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Danno wrote:

Depends. If you're going for instant effect, and want large plants, I'd suggest that you find a good local nursery near you that can supply you with these plants.

Absolutely. My best source is Bluestone Perennials (www.bluestoneperennials.com). Their plants are tiny, but healthy, and the price is just wonderful. No matter which online source you choose, and there are a million of them, be sure to check out other people's experiences at http://plantsbymail.net/ or http://gardenwatchdog.com /

At least in theory, you can plant all season long as long as you are willing to pamper the plant and water diligently. Fall and spring are generally better times for planting. I generally spend the summer and fall preparing the bed, the winter planning the layout, and then planting in spring.
Suja
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Suja wrote:

I second the recommendation for Bluestone... and I also say that for quickly growing a large plant, a local nursery *may* give better results if it is a *very* good nursery and grows its own plants. If it is a typical nursery which buys from wholesalers -- don't bother. You can pay Bluestone about $8 for three miniscule Boltonias in a little 3-pak, or you can pay your nursery about $8 for one slightly larger Boltonia in a gallon pot. By the beginning of the second year each of the little baby ones will be bigger and healthier than the one from the nursery, whose roots have had a couple of years to get accustomed to growing in a gallon pot. Bluestone plants are tiny, but man, are they ready to grow!
Caveat: the closer you live to Bluestone, the happier you'll be with your plants; if the plants get to you in 1-2 days they are absolutely garden-fresh, but if you are on the West Coast and it's 4-5 days, they can get a bit sad-looking in transit.
- Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I bought some perrenials from Bluestone last year. Yarrow "Coronation Gold" and Shasta Daisy "Alaska" are two I bought that match your list. They were very small the first year, and I didn't get a lot of blooms. They look great this year, and are growing very nicely.
I expect that it will usually take a year for the plants to get started, but I was happy enough that I ordered some more this year, and expect to do so again next year. The shopping experience was easy and painless. I prefer browsing the paper catalog and then ordering online. You can order a catalog online.
I also bought some shrubs from them and I'll say that you need a lot of patience for that. They were really really tiny, and they're all still pretty small the second year, although less likely to be stepped on. I did get some blooms from a Northern Highlights Azalea. We'll see how they do next year.
Swyck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

>

They sure are tiny... but if you live within driving distance of their greenhouses, you can go to the end-of-spring clearance sale and fill a flat with shrubs for $20!!! Try to beat that. Also, individual shrubs, not part of the clearance sale, are $1.50 each on that day.
- Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Dan,
It is usually not advised to plant perennials now. You can buy some, keep them in their original pot, and wait until the fall when it is cooler to plant them. The argument is that summer heat is stressful enough, heat and transplanting can be too stressful for the plant (maybe if you played soothing music to the plant it might help..ha ha). Anyway, that being said, I have often gone to local nurseries late in the summer b/c the plants are on sale. Most of the nurseries near me have clearance sales starting in August. Sure, the selection isn't as good, but the prices are great. Last year, we had a super hot summer in NC, and a record drought. I bought some clearance perennials, and disregarding all advice, I planted them right away in the heat, and only gave my new plants minimal water once a week. They all survived. If you don't mind being on email lists, I sign up for email updates from my local nurseries. They always send out notices when the plants are going on sale. I look forward to the "all perennials 50% off" emails!
This link was posted earlier, it is a review of plant mail order catalogues/websites: <http://plantsbymail.net/ .
I have purchased from White Flower Farms and Blue Stone Perennials. My experience has been okay, w/ both, however I find the price of the plants and shipping just isn't worth it. Most mail order plants are very young and tender, I think it is a better deal to pay a hair more at a local nursery for a more mature plant--you'll get more immediate results w/ mature plants. I have been lucky enough to find a couple of local nurseries that sell wholesale to the public. Since I live in NC, this doesn't help much, except to say that hopefully someone in your neck of the woods might know of some wholesalers near you. You might try looking in the phonebook or doing a websearch for wholesale nurseries in your area, and calling to see if they will sell to the public. One word of caution, I don't know if this is common for all wholesalers, but the ones around here are not staffed to help the public. It makes sense, it just means you need to plan ahead before you go w/ a list of all your plants, including scientific names. One wholesaler in our area does not even have name tags on any plants, so if you go you need to be able to ID a plant yourself. However, the other wholesalers do have plants sorted w/ nametags, alphabetized by sci. name. The tags have no pictures or descriptions, so you really need to know what you want, what variety, etc... It is helpful to bring a perennial book along, or a master gardener friend.
Your selections sounds great! Heidi
Danno wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--------------E823247AA2E3E9E2E9EE23A2 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
You may want to check with the great magazine English Garden that is published here in the US as well as England. They have excellent photos and ideas. Randy
Danno wrote:

-- snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net
--------------E823247AA2E3E9E2E9EE23A2 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> You may want to check with the great magazine English Garden that is published here in the US as well as England. They have excellent photos and ideas. Randy <p>Danno wrote: <blockquote TYPE=CITE>Hello all- <br>I'm interested in planting an English Garden for my wife on the side of our <br>house. <br>I live in New Jersey and the side of my home gets about Sun about 1/2 of the <br>day. <p>Here are some of the plants I've been looking at- <br>Yarrow (comes in a variety of colours) <br>Hollyhock( again,a vaiety to choose from) <br>Lady's Mantle <br>Boltonia <br>Snow in Summer <br>Perennial flax <br>Delphinium "Pacific Hybrids" <br>Dianthus <br>Bellflower <br>Foxglove <br>Lavender <br>Candytuft <br>Shasta Daisy <br>Lupin <br>Canterbury Bells <br>Peony <br>Sea Thrift <br>Forget-Me-Not <br>Siberian Iris <br>Fairy Thimble <p>Question-- what's the best place to buy perennials?&nbsp; can you do it on-line? <p>- is it too late in the season to plant these?? <p>Thanks, <br>Dan</blockquote>
<p>-- <br> snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net <br>&nbsp;</html>
--------------E823247AA2E3E9E2E9EE23A2--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.