Need to remove my existing driveway

I'm planing to do remove my existing driveway this summer and build new garage on the other side of the house. Does anyone have experience with removing pavement driveway? What tools to use? Any tips? I leave in NJ
Thanks, Jim
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On 4/21/07 10:56 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@l77g2000hsb.googlegroups.com, "draku"

C
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draku wrote:

The Pro's use a Bobcat 'tractor' with forks & a sledge hammer & support blocks.
These Pro's are musclemen with both the experience & tools/equipment.
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If you are lucky, the driveway is a 4" slap poured on a flat surface, and will come up easily. If you are not lucky, you may find your driveway was poured over a bed of rubble and construction junk, and will go 12" or deeper in some places, and will not come up easily. I recently had my driveway replaced, and part of my driveway was the latter. They actually got their tractor stuck trying to get some of the pieces up. There were bricks, rock, and all kinds of junk
Here are some pics of my driveway being removed, it shows some clean slabs coming up easily, and it shows them having to drill other pieces for every little piece they could get out.
http://emberts.no-ip.info/stuff/20062007DrivewayReplacement/2006december /
Do like others have suggested. Hire a local excavator to do it for you - they have the equipment and experience, and know how to get it up and dispose of it. It's well worth the money, and should not cost very much.

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Hire it done. Once you get the concrete broken up (and you may be dealing with re-rod or wire in the slab), you'll have to load it and find a proper dump or recycling venue for it. Expect the concrete to be a minimum thickness of 4" -- 5 is quite likely. Then you will also have to deal with a crushed stone compacted underlayment if it was done "properly".
But if you really want the exercise, concrete saw or jackhammer, sledgehammer, pry bars and possibly a sawzall... Don't forget safety glasses, gloves and steel toe boots. Dust masks are adviseable.
Asphalt and compacted stone are easier to remove, but I suspect your "pavement" = my "concrete".
Kay
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OP "forgot" to note this is an asphalt driveway. See alt.building.construction newsgroup.
--
Dave

Apathy and denial are close cousins
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If you like to garden why not erect a series of raised gardens on the pavement and grow some veggies? http://raised-garden-bed.com/Chapt10.html
Johnny
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It's much better to have it professionally removed. Why keep it if you can get rid of it? I moved a driveway years ago to the other side of the house, the worst part was getting rid of the huge curbstones the original owner had installed.
Also around here it's considered hazardous waste if you bury it at all.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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