Looking for rare, maybe non-existant tool...

I'd like to have a tap and die set in 5/8" NPT.
Why am I posting here? Because I bet nearly all of you have lots of stuff in this size and didn't even know it. I believe it happens to be garden hose size.
I have an exterior faucet with the threads grown up with mineral deposits so that I can no longer get a hose screwed on, and would like to chase the threads.
For some obscure reason, all standard tap and die sets for plumbing skip from 1/2" to 3/4", yet 5/8" became the standard for garden (and some washer) hoses.
Obviously, the folks who make faucets and garden hose stuff have tools to make these threads. Anyone familiar enough to point me to a source?
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wrote:

I found something for British standard but not NTP at http://www.jtsmach.com/jtswebshop/asp/dies_index.asp
Try asking in rec.crafts.metalworking.
People there know a lot about a lot of things.
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If the r.c.m guys can't help you, why not fill a plastic bag with vinegar and tie it to the faucet? Keep the thread part in the vinegar. Replace as needed. Cheaper than a new faucet or a rare tap and die.
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: > wrote: : : >>I have an exterior faucet with the threads grown up : >>with mineral deposits so that I can no longer get a : >>hose screwed on, and would like to chase the threads. : : If the r.c.m guys can't help you, why not fill a plastic bag with : vinegar and tie it to the faucet? Keep the thread part in the : vinegar. Replace as needed. Cheaper than a new faucet or a rare : tap and die.
I was going to suggest that too Ed, I would add that after you let it soak over night, use a wire brush to scrub it. You may get much of the buildup off this way.
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Thanks for the suggestion. I may give that a try if I can't find a threading die. My thought is that acid may dissolve some of the base metal as well as the mineral deposits, so I will have to be careful with it.
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Household vinegar (5% acetic acid) shouldn't hurt the base metal much. I soaked a bucket of badly rusted hand tools in vinegar for a few weeks once. They came out nice and clean. The few things that were pitted were damaged by the rust, not by the acid.
Jan
--
The way to a man's heart is between the fourth and the fifth rib.

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No no no... vinegar is not like real acid. It shouldn't hurt the bronze or zinc, it just works on the calcium.
Soaking things lke shower heads and faucet diffusers is a very common housewifey thing to do .. really, it's ok. If I'll do it to pieces of my $250 faucet, I have no problem doing it to a $9 faucet head.
Use white vinegar, about $1.89 or you can buy quarts.
Let us know what you do and how it all works out, ok!
:)
Kate
says... : > If the r.c.m guys can't help you, why not fill a plastic bag with : > vinegar and tie it to the faucet? Keep the thread part in the : > vinegar. Replace as needed. Cheaper than a new faucet or a rare : > tap and die. : : Thanks for the suggestion. I may give that a try if I can't find : a threading die. My thought is that acid may dissolve some of the : base metal as well as the mineral deposits, so I will have to be : careful with it.
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Ol' Duffer wrote:

Actually, I think it's a 3/4" hose thread rather than a pipe thread. It's certainly not an NPT thread, although it could be an NPS (straight, not tapered).
Try chasing the threads with a smallish triangle file. I've done that before with bolts and studs; the brass threads on a hosebib should be eay, and they're only a half inch long or less. Just follow the existing threads, it's not like you are cutting new threads with just a file. HTH :-)
Bob
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It's definitely tapered. I know some of the new stuff is straight, probably cheaper to make, but this faucet is over 40 years old and was done to the standards in force at the time.
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Have you tried a good scrubbing with something like CLR and a stiff brush? Is there some reason that you can't replace this hose bibb? (It's usually a fairly minor chore -- see Sept 2003 This Old House magazine.)
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Sure I could replace it, but cutting around siding, draining plumbing, soldering, and caulking is a lot of wasted time and material for an otherwise working part that just needs cleaned up. Brush or chemicals risk damaging the base metal, whereas a threading die (unless cross- threaded) would remove only the crud between the threads. Yes there are other approaches, but a die seemed like the best first choice.
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says... : > Have you tried a good scrubbing with something like CLR and a stiff brush? : > Is there some reason that you can't replace this hose bibb? (It's usually : > a fairly minor chore -- see Sept 2003 This Old House magazine.) : : Sure I could replace it, but cutting around siding, draining plumbing, : soldering, and caulking is a lot of wasted time and material for an : otherwise working part that just needs cleaned up. Brush or chemicals : risk damaging the base metal, whereas a threading die (unless cross- : threaded) would remove only the crud between the threads. Yes there : are other approaches, but a die seemed like the best first choice.
Hmmm... it isn't threaded on?
By the time you got all of this posted, you could have tried the vinegar trick.
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Are you sure it's 5/8 NPT? What makes you think that?
Home Depot sells adapters from pipe threads to hose threads and the male 3/4 pipe threads x male hose threads are hard to tell apart. The difference appears to be that (1) the pipe thread is tapered and (2) the hose end has a flat surface for the washer to bear on. The hose fitting has only a few threads, so I can't see if they're tapered, but I suspect it's not a NPT size at all. There's no reason for it to be a pipe thread since the hose is sealed to the faucet by a washer rather than jamming two tapered threads together.
For a single faucet repair, it seems like overkill to buy a die (probably $20-50 for a special size) to clean the threads. Two possibilities come to mind: (1) you can take a triangular file or a dentist pick and clean out the threads with some careful hand work. (Your dentist probably throws out worn dental picks, so you might check with him/her.) This might take an hour, but you have probably already spent that much time trying to find a die. (2) you could replace the faucet with a new one (cost around $5-15 including a few fittings). This might require some interior plumbing, but it's within the capabilities of the average homeowner. Most exterior faucets (at least in New England) come with an indoor shutoff with a drain so you can keep the faucet from splitting in the winter. That makes it fairly easy to install a new faucet after that point. And also to shut off the water when you really screw it up.
If you're doing some other plumbing, it might be easier to get the fittings from a plumbing supply house or Home Depot. They have both male and female hose ends, also swivel hose ends (the standard female hose fitting found on the hose). They come with 3/4 or 1/2 pipe threads on the other end, male or female.
Ol' Duffer wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@haystack.mit.edu says...

It's bigger than 1/2", smaller than 3/4", and tapered. I think I heard from an old-timer that it was 5/8".
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Ol' Duffer wrote:

Use a wire brush.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Your main problem is going to be that hoses are not standard NPT. They have much bigger threads so you dont spend your whole life screwing it on and off. You would be better off finding a cheap grinding tool with a firm wire brush wheel.
Toad
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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 19:51:33 GMT, "Travis"

Good advice, because the hose bib thread is not a NPT (tapered thread) It is a straight thread that does not seal on the thread, but requires a washer seal. A tap and die for that thread, in the hands of a DIY'er would be unusual indeed. You might also consider changing the bib.
Regards,
Hal
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Yes, there is such a tool. It will be offered soon on the internet The tool used to be sold through a mailorder company years ago, an will be available again soon. There are tens of thousands in use now Price will be in the ballpark of $9.95 plus S&H. It "chases" the threads on hose bibs, then a cutting blade surface the washer seat to restore the hose bib connection. Was popular amon home owners and RV's ers when they were available. (Hose bibs in R parks often have damaged threads, and or washer seats.) It can also be used to "true" the male end of a hose in the event i is smashed...like when you run over it with a car If you want to be on the list once the first order arrives soon fro manufacturer, just let me know and I'll advise when ready to ship Web site should be up and you can order online within a month or so If you need one immediately, I could probably get one to you
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I looked and asked for one of these every likely place I could think of last year, and mostly got blank stares. Yes, I am interested, and here's an e-mail you can send to: snipped-for-privacy@radiohospital.com
com.no-spam.invalid says...

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