Liquifying food scraps for fertilizer

Due to various reasons I am unable to keep a compost pile. Each week I throw out a small plastic bag of vegetable peelings and scraps. I had the idea of pureeing them, either in a blender or a food processor or both, maybe diluting it with water, then using the result as fertilizer in my garden. Just wondering if anyone has tried this?
Dee
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Dee wrote:

what do you grow?
if you are growing the same kinds of vegetables there can be some disease/pests transmission if you are using unsterilized materials.

no, i have not. it takes quite a bit to puree a stem from a woody plant. i think the energy involved and the damage to the machine/blades makes this an expensive and intensive way to recycle scraps (not counting the cleanup too).
check out worm composting. for the amount of scraps you are talking about you could probably get by with one or two small bins and the amount of processing isn't too bad (no more than you'd be doing if you were feeding and cleaning a puree machine and digging a trench to cover the slurry).
songbird
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Tossing raw garbage/sewerage into a garden will cause diseases to spread. If you have a garden there is no reason why you can't set aside a small space for composting.
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wrote:

It will work, but may attract unwanted insects, or animals.
During periods when the beds aren't in use, you can also bury kitchen scraps in 8" - 10" deep trenches. Dig them first, and then fill them in as you use them.
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Dee wrote:

It would be simpler to just roughly chop them roughly by hand while you have the knife in your hand and then bury them weekly. You can put them in unused ground or in between shrubs, trees etc, even alongside annuals if you don't damage the roots. They will decompose and enrich the soil, no smell and less chance to attract vermin.
D
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I have also burried a big bottomless plastic pot up to the rim int he garden and put chopped scraps into it. i drilled big holes all roudn the side of it in multiple places and use an old 1950s/60s era metal hub cap from a Holden as a lid. The idea behind it was to be a worm farm for free range worms. In reality, I forget to give it enough liquid so it's only an intermitent worm station.
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I've done that but only to put the slurry in my worm farm.
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Forgot to mention that I would be spreading it on my perennial/shrub beds.
The scraps generally consist of cucumber peelings, tomato cores, wilted lettuce leaves and bean sprouts, onion ends, and the like.
I have a blender, so I may give it a whirl <pun intended> if for no other reason than to quench my curiosity :-)
Dee
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