layering

i'm headed to my NY place for a week, & there are a couple black mulberry trees there. i would like to try layering a few branches so i can bring rooted starts back to NH this summer/fall. any suggestions or advice? normally i'd not be going back until late June, but if i need to check the layering i can go down on weekends (and if i need to do that, i'll be planting more fruit trees <g>) lee
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In your situation I would rely more on rooting cuttings than layering... with layering someone would need to see to regular watering. Perhaps you can use both methods simultaneously. But were it me I'd bring home some branches in a bucket of water. Be warned you're liable to be very old before you see any berries... you may do better to buy some saplings. I adore Chinese weeping mulberry. My neighbor diagonally across the road has some lovely ancient ones in front of her 200+ year old farm house, those mulberrys are probably as old:
http://i41.tinypic.com/xlw482.jpg
Btw, that's my hay.
All about: http://mulberrytrees.co.uk /
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yes, i could do that, thanks.

are the weeping mulberry black or white? white mulberry is an invasive here, but black mulberry is native. those are very nice looking trees though. i do like weeping cultivars...

well, it beats mowing every week, but what do you do with the hay? i see quite a few places that hay the big round bales & just leave them to rot at the field's edge (or worse, out in the middle of the field). can you use it as mulch or is it too seedy? i've got 10+ acres of pasture, but the 4 llamas & 2 goats keep it 'mowed'. it's too hilly & rocky to hay anyway. lee
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I think they're black, or very dark red.

I have a neighbor down the road who raises beef cattle, he hays my land and pays my taxes. The farmers around here always leave about 10% of the bales so the deer will have food for winter. Whatever is left in spring they collect and use for bedding.
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the messy kind :) people seem to like the white mulberries because they don't stain everything purple. i prefer to plant native plants if possible.

i have some feed plots for the deer out in the woodlot. there's an area near my border with the late Mr. Shaw's landlocked woods that is quite open (it's where i have veneer grade trees growing), with Mr.Shaw's lot having a lot of overgrown hemlock & pine on the one side, my wetlands at the bottom, & the town woodlot at the top. it's been planted with forage. i'm not sure about the deer, but the moose seems to like it. if my tractor had higher ground clearance i could haul hay out there in the winter. i'll have to think about how to accomplish that. anything that keeps the deer out of the pasture is a good thing. they're alternate hosts for menengial worms (along with snails/slugs). they don't bother deer, but they are frequently fatal to camelids. lee
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Doesn't look like Brooklyn to me. Where in NY are you located ??
Peter
Zone 6 where the sun finally came out after 4 days of rain.... (I'm gonna go plant something)
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Haven't you been to Prospect Park? Nah, I moved to the Catskills.
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Off the Hudson River Valley??? Like as in Pete Seegar... or Sleepy Hollow or "Washington Slept Here" country ??
Peter
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wrote:

I have had the most success with the method my father taught me. Dig a trench where you can bend a branch down, pin it and bury it. You can scrape the bark a little and apply some rooting hormone, but not necessary. I wait a year, but you can check for roots in 6 months.
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i'll have to see if i can get any branches to the ground. sounds like a pretty easy method. lee
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All I do is add a handful of dirt and place a brick or rock on then check back 2 o3 years latter. Cut it of the main plant and remove a year latter.
Bill who never got the hang of air layering .
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

Not all who wander are lost.
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