Lavender - what am I doing wrong?

I planted 3 lavender plants in my yard back in early spring. They look healthy, but they aren't growing much, and they aren't putting out any of the lavendar flowers. Two are in full sun and one is in part sun/part shade, but they all look the same.
I'm in zone 5, southeast Nebraska.
Thanks, Brigitte
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Brigitte,

What you need is patience... :) My lavender had to stand a cold winter before blooming and growing fast this year (I'm in zone 6). I'm not sure whether it'll survive in zone 5 (oh, a rhyme, a rhyme!), you may need a bit of protection in winter. But I'm sure it'll bloom next year then.
Best wishes Gaby
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Mrs. Gaby Chaudry
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"Brigitte J." wrote:

What variety are they and where did you get them ? I've had three from Kelly nurseries in the ground since mid May and they don't appear to be getting any higher than 6 or 7 inches and not even hinting at a bloom. Maybe they're just too young ?
Ma
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wrote:

I've had variable luck with lavender planted in the same location. I have one plant that is going strong (and with beautiful flowers) after 3 years. It even recovered after this particularly cold winter (zone 6). It died down, I thought I lost it, but in the spring it took off and looks better than ever probably because the cold acted like a hard pruning. I planted a different variety nearby that didn't make it even *to* the winter. This spring I bought another 3 different varieties as small plants. None are growing really well, though they are not withering either. One did bring up a few flowers; I suspect it is the same variety as my big one.
Unfortunately, as I am going to have to have my front porch rebuilt, these plants will have to be moved temporarily. I hope the big one, at least, survives.
So, just wait until next year and see what happens!
Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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wrote:

It took my lavender one year from seed to plant outdoors, and another year before they flowered. The ones in full sun will eventually bloom for you. They will do best if you refrain from feeding and watering. although I have feed mine with extra diluted fish emulsion.
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It might be wise to consider the general rule of thumb of perennials - "The first year they SLEEP - the second year, they CREEP, and the third year, they LEAP".

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I'm in Montreal, which I think is zone 4 based on the proximity to upper NY/Vermont states and the zones there. In the spring of 2003, I bought two types of "hardy" lavender grown in Canada. Given that it's sold here as "hardy" I expected it to survive the winters here (not in a greenhouse)! Hardy is relative, after all.
Both types thrived over the summer and even flowered. I was fairly pleased. However, only one of the two types survived last winter. They were both planted in relatively the same spots, and I had three plants of each kind. The plastic tag in the plants that survived said " Lavandula Angustifolia 'Hidcode' ". The ones that didn't survive were called Lavandula Heterophylla 'Goodwin Creek', which was a variety whose leaves were more grayish (and fuzzy) in color. The dead plants were very dry and woody when I finally pulled them out in the spring. My wife said the plastic tags resembled "tombstones".
This spring I tried to buy more of the 'hidcote' variety, although I couldn't find it exactly. The new lavender haven't yet shown signs of thriving this summer, but they don't look sick. I bought a few new perennials this spring; some are doing very well, some ok, some look shocked. I think it depends on many things -- the soil, the plant's health prior to transplanting, the weather after transplanting, etc.
Finally, the flowering I got from last year's 'hidcote' lavender is spectacular this summer! It actually resembles the beauty of the plant on the plastic tag!
Hang in there -- good luck with your lavender.
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I have heard that lavender grows very slowly.
My lavender angustfolia (?) started from seed this spring is 5 inches high (compared to the tomatoes started around the same time at 5 feet and already making babies.)
The smell is quite girly. I wonder if it was such a good idea.
(SE Virginia)
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