landscaping trees

greetings,
our landscape architect has picked the following trees to use in/around our patio/pool area. would appreciate any comments...
1) 3 betula nigra 'duraheat' (river birch) 2) 1 magnolia butterflies 3) 3 lagerstoemia indica 'dynamite' (crape myrtle) 4) 1 acer pal. diss. 'ever red' (laceleaf japanese maple) 5) 2 ilex x. 'mary nell' (holly 'mary nell')
i'm a bit concerned about size of a few of the trees. the manolia will be w/in 4 ft from our 2nd story deck. 1 of the birches will be w/in 8-10 ft from the deck.
thoughts?
thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

None of them would be good choices if you live near the artic circle, or at the equator. Without knowing something about where you might fall between those extremes, it's hard to offer much useful comment.
--
Warren H.

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i live in Northern VA (zone 7-8 i believe). i'm a bit worried about the size (height) and if the roots are particularly invasive as they'll be near some concrete pavers that we'll be putting down.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

According to the Sunset Western Garden Book.

50 to 90 ft tall and 40 to 60 ft wide

to 20 ft tall and to 15 ft wide

this particular one is not in the book but the sizes vary widely

a 7 ft mound

this particular one is not in the book but they vary from a small shrub to a very tall tree

The birch, magnolia and the maple all lose their leaves in the fall. I wouldn't want that anywhere near my pool.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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On 7 Mar 2005 18:16:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ten years (those with lesser skills, at least). They put potentially big trees where they will not fit when mature, squeeze three plants in where one mature one will be crowded, and sometimes choose plants that are more pretty than sustainable (due to soil issues, weather, or whatever). Perhaps it's not always a bad way to go--you can always thin out two plants later--but if you plant a big tree within 4' of your house you'll just be planting a lifetime's worth of headaches for yourself or any future residents.
On a related note, the quality of the installation is questionable for many tree transplants. Trees that are planted too deep, or with the burlap/wire basket intact, or with codominant leaders, or with girdling roots are nothing but income for removal companies and replacement plantings a few years down the road.
To improve your odds, learn a bit about choosing a good specimen and planting it correctly, and do it yourself or supervise those you hire (a year guarantee won't cut it when you're talking trees most of the time). Further, a sapling will be less prone to many of the common problems and will establish in the native soil quickly, and will overtake the larger, slower-to-establish trees within a few years, so save your money and get young trees.
See consumer info brochures on these and other tree topics at www.treesaregood.com
good luck,
Keith Babberney Isa Certified Arborist
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it seems the birches are definitely too large for the area. can someone point me to the single trunk variety of the crape myrtle? i believe this is the species that is used around our town hall building and something that would fit the bill.
thanks!
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All great choices for our area, all great cultivars as well. Duraheat is a fantastic variety which you will love.
That's a tad close for the magnolia, although it's a dainty tree and will take a long time to encroach. It's amendable to pruning, however.
The dissectum Japanese Maple is a tad cliched in our area now. (overused, ubiquitous).
-- David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7) email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com http://beyondgardening.com/Albums

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hi david, what would you recommend as an alternative to the laceleaf? this tree will be at the far end of our pool and considered sort of the "showcase" tree. i agree, something on the exotic side would be preferred here.
thanks!
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Ginkgo biloba.
On 8 Mar 2005 05:11:39 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com opined:

Need a good, cheap, knowledge expanding present for yourself or a friend? http://www.animaux.net/stern/present.html
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yep, got a few of those in the plan for the yard further out as they're quite large fully grown. was looking for something a bit smaller (20-30ft or so?). too bad citrus trees don't grow well here. a nice lemon or orange would be cool.
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from snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com contains these words:

Fallen leaves would be a reason I'd never have birch or holly near a pool. A single birch has literally millions of very small leaves, catkins and seeds, that's a lot of pool-vaccuuming and potential filter-blocking (compared with, say, a large-leafed magnolia). Holly leaf prickles are very painful for bare skin and feet, and don't fall into the mistake of thinking they don't shed leaves.
There must be pool-specialists who provide lists of recommended poolside plants, surely?
Janet.
Janet.
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The duraheats will get abit large...the others should be OK as long as you maintain them
--
Mike LaMana, MS, CTE
Consulting Forester & Arborist
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so my research has put me at replacing the 3 birches with
2 tibetan cherry (love that bark) 1 japanese snowbell
still haven't found a replacement for the jap maple at the far end of the pool. what variety of maple do people like here? i looked at the harry lauder walking stick but the foliage wasn't particularly attractive to me.
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