Joint compound as fertilizer/conditioner

Page 2 of 3  


I appreciate the links, I actually already knew what it was made from, but it was how those ingredients interacted with plants that I was unsure of.
Really the EVA is the only thing that concerns me, but I wouldn't expect it to be a large amount of the joint compound. Perlite is another potential problem, don't have any real knowledge of that stuff and what its good for.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perlite's the easy one.... It's probably not expanded in joint compound, but it is a common ingredient in potting soil. If you're determined to use this stuff, fill your bucket with water for a thin slurry and let it sit overnight. Skim off anything that floats and that may get rid of the vinyl/plastic/rubber crap. But, I wouldn't bother.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perlite
"In horticulture it makes composts more open to air, while still having good water-retention properties; it makes a good medium for hydroponics.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Calcium is an element not a nutrient. Comosted wood and nurse logs add calcium, the element.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 24 Aug 2007 18:20:58 -0400, "symplastless"

Nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, iron, copper, maganese are also elements and also nutrients when used by plants after breaking down into forms root hairs can uptake those nutrients.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I printed out this post and put it on my lawn. I can see the grass starting to turn green already
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Took me a second to get that. Then I was ROFL! ;-D
Thanks.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The key to youth is immaturity :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would say the key to youth is imagination ...
On Sat, 25 Aug 2007 19:46:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@sakajawa.org wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Who are you? If you want a green lawn try applying magnesium. The center are every chlorophyll molecule is magnesium.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:03:30 -0400, "symplastless"

Actually, mine is rather green just from water and mowing. We have a lot of minerals in the water, and presumably the soil as well.
Magnesium does work well on the roses, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Charles
Are you suggesting that roses are sensitive to magnesium?
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Aug 2007 21:49:15 -0400, "symplastless"

I am saying that when I occasionally put a magnesium sulfate solution on the soil near the base of the roses that I notice the leaf color appears to be a darker green and the bloom color is more intense. (well, on the yellow rose, anyway, I haven't tried it on the others.)
And I only do it once a year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charles
Sorry. I am glad I asked. I misread your statement. Question: Is Epson Salts a good supply for magnesium? Thanks.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 Aug 2007 18:07:40 -0400, "symplastless"

Yes. It also might be useful to break up a clay soil, but gypsum, calcium sulfate, is usually recommended. Too much magnesium can be bad, like too much of anything. I use a tablespoon in water, once a year, per rose bush.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

try trimming a bit when leaving short comments.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 Aug 2007 11:58:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:
(snip)

I should have, I thought about it, but couldn't decide where to snip, what to leave in, so I just reposted the whole thing.
I'll try to find some examples to follow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It all depends on the source. nutrient is a generic term for anything needed by biological systems. as in micronutrients. scientific will refer to organic vs inorganic nutrients. Ingrid
On Sat, 25 Aug 2007 08:21:54 -0400, "symplastless"

and other substances>essential for life,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fungi can absorb energy sources such as carbohydrates. Plants cannot do so. Fungi can absorb nutrients. Nutrients are substances that contain an energy source, elements, and other substances in types and amounts that are essential for a healthy life. You can give a fungus a nutrient in the dark and it will thrive. You can give a plant a nutrient in the dark and it will die. Plants require light energy from the sun to "make" glucose from carbon - dioxide and water. The process is called photosynthesis. When you call fertilizers or nutrients food for trees and other plants it shows you are ignorant of photosynthesis. many people obviously do not understand plants. Sad, very sad.
Foods are substances that contain an energy source mostly, and may contain some elements, and other substances. The main part of food is the energy source. There are junk foods, fatty foods, and healthy foods. There are many diet books telling you about healthy foods. Animals can absorb an energy source. Plants cannot absorb an energy source. fertilizers are not plant foods. Fertilizers provide elements essential for growth of plants. The elements are part of salts, usually, that ionize in water. Ions are charged particles; anions, negative, and cations, positive. Plants "make" carbohydrates by trapping the light energy of the sun in a process called photosynthesis. Sad that so many people who work with plants do not know this. They call fertilizers plant food. very sad.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
beware of so called tree biologist that have never studied biology.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do not know who you are referring too. Myself, I am an arborist who has studied tree biology. My resume is here: http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/educat.htmlMy claim is that I have completed what is mentioned in my resume. No more no less.
I am a self taught tree biologist. I for my thesis wrote a paper on what logging is. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
I used reviewed published data in US Forest Service Docs and others for the latter.
To help other people understand basic tree biology I or shall I was we, wrote a Tree Biology Dictionary. Its free.
Here is the address: www.treedictionary.com
Other than that I do not understand what or who you are refering too.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.