is it possible to grow fruit trees organically

Page 3 of 3  
--------------551380C4EA102F0E05B63917 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
The only chickens in my suburb are the ones serving on the village board.
Sherwin D.
simy1 wrote:

--------------551380C4EA102F0E05B63917 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <tt>The only chickens in my suburb are the ones serving on the</tt> <br><tt>village board.</tt><tt></tt><p><tt>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sherwin D.</tt> <p>simy1 wrote:<blockquote TYPE=CITE>Jangchub wrote: <br>> <br>> The way you grow organic fruit, commercial production included isto <br>> support healthy soils, use of certified organic fertilizer, addition <br>> of compost each year, good soil aeration, proper hygiene after the <br>> production season is over, not leaving diseased fruits laying around, <br>> etc.&nbsp; There is nothing anyone can do about rot on peaches, organicOR <br>> synthetic.&nbsp; There's a lot more to it than you are willing tolearn. <p>and chickens of course. Virtually all organic apple orchards have <br>chickens to clean up the orchard. Not really new technology - chickens <br>have been used as garden pesticides/weedkillers for thousands of years. <br>In the case of apples, both apple maggots and curculio overwinter as <br>grubs in the first two inches of soil, just within chicken range. If <br>you have seen them in action, eating everything from the most invisible <br>seed to 2-ft snakes, you know that they are very efficient. If youlet <br>them into the garden when the veggies are up they will destroy it ina <br>day.</blockquote> </html>
--------------551380C4EA102F0E05B63917--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just HAVE to share this story!
I used to keep laying hens. Oh, those big, gorgeous yolks that practically stoodup and saluted! Real organic. too.
Though they had plenty of room to scratch around back in their own fenced off area, I used to let them out into the yard to "play" once in a while.
My office gives on the yard, so when the phone rang, and I had to answer it (this was before mobiles), the chickens figured out that one pretty quick; no sooner did the phone ring, they knew I was going to answer it, so they HURLED themselves on my veg garden and commenced to destroy.
Dom't tell me chickens are stupid (well, like Pavlov's dogs...
--
Persephone

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I know what you mean about the chickens. I let mine out most Saturday afternoons when the farmer (Me) likes to suck on a few pints of ale. When I head for the house to get another cold one.... the sneaky little bastards head for the cabbage patch. They sometimes catch me nodding off and........ I think they are charming creatures. I enjoy their company and the composted chicken exhaust grows fabulous vegetables.
Farmer John 45N,77W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 29 Jul 2006 12:06:32 -0400, "fudge"

I enjoy their company and the composted

is still so fertile, thanks to chickie doo-doo, just drop in seeds and stand back!
Persephone 34 00' 57" N , 118 27' 04" W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jangchub wrote:

I use chemicals occasionally and I have more fruit than I know what to do with. I'm thinning and thinning, and I still can't reduce it enough.

These are good practices, but I'm not going to pay extra for the certified organic fertilizer. I don't like drawing comparisons to religion, but it reminds me of orthodox people (Muslims, Jews, etc.) who pay a big premium to have their meat slaughtered in the correct fashion so it can be certified acceptable.
I'm sorry but I don't belong to the church of organic.
Sherwin D.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's a nice buzz phrase which tells me you have no idea what organic growing is. A bag of certified organic fertilizer costs me 18 dollars and it covers 7,500 square feet, hardly paying extra.
I'm not in the church of trying to explain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sherwindu wrote:

It is a fact of life that in my six years on the West Coast I have seen many fruit trees producing quality fruit organically. Not just fig trees and citrus, which is understandable, but apple trees, apricots, and all sorts of plums, even in cool climates like Eugene or Portland. It could be the the lack of alternate hosts for apple maggot and curculio in the area, so that they might simply not be there. When i was living in the Bay Area, there was an abandoned orchard of Red Delicious apples a mile from my place. The trees, you could tell they had not been pruned in decades. You could go there and fill bags of the sweetest apples, and they were all good. I saw a similar abandoned orchard in the Utah high desert, and the apples were also good.
For that matter, I have seen good apples growing on wild trees and abandoned orchards on Beaver Island, which is in the middle of Lake Michigan. They were mostly cider apples (I was there in August, so I could taste them), which probably were planted when the island was a refueling center in mid-1850. They were unblemished by insect. Probably insects were never brought in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's no longer possible to grow perfect, insect-free apples without using pesticides. But you can probably get close if your orchard hygiene is impeccable and if you use traps for coddling moths and apple maggots. A few bug stings or apple maggot tracks really don't hurt anything in fresh apples that you plan to eat right away, but they ruin the apples for storage.
Asian pears are pretty close to apples, but I don't recall my crazy great-aunt having problems with insect damage to her Asian pears, and she didn't spray anything.
You'll probably need to spray the grapes with something like Bordeaux mixture for fungus. I think Bordeaux mixture (copper sulfate and slaked lime) is allowed for organically grown fruits.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
zxcvbob wrote:

Never was.

Depending on the degree of infestation, traps are expensive and in my experience do not do a complete job.

I'm not sure what kind of apple maggots you have, but when I pick an apple with a maggot in it, it is obvious from the destruction inside that this apple is a 'tosser'.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
here in Wisconsin I grow asian pears, peaches, apricots, cherries, vine kiwi, berries, grapes and figs without spray. I live in the city and am flanked by two huge apple trees some ass planted in their back yards. thankfully (I have a koi pond) they dont bother spraying the trees and the apples are inedible. It is impossible to grow fruit without pesticides if neighbors have unattended fruit trees that act as a breeding ground for pests. I hear down in Florida they are finally getting the idea and cutting down people's unattended or diseased back yard fruit trees. I do use dormant spray, and it looks like I am going to have to use some fungicide on a peach that is infected. but what I do is treat a single tree, like the cherry this spring. cleanliness is absolutely necessary, and making sure the place where the stock is bought is clean so trees dont come in infected and spread disease to the other trees too. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List at http://weloveteaching.com/puregold / sign up: http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?hl=en&q=puregold&qt_s=Group+lookup www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I receive no compensation for running the Puregold list or Puregold website. I do not run nor receive any money from the ads at the old Puregold site. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Zone 5 next to Lake Michigan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

Curious. Who determines if they are unattended? Do the owners have a say in this? Diseased trees can sometimes be recovered. Sounds like a big invasion of personal property.
Sherwin D.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This happened in 2001. Florida had an infestation of citrus canker bacteria which growers feared would decimate the commercial citrus industry. To control the infestation authorities came in and removed all domestic citrus trees, healthy or not, no choice. They were protecting the commercial groves.
Details: http://www.floridatrend.com/issue/default.asp?aB78&s=1&d=2/1/2001
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some grapes suffer from little or no pest or disease damage, but they may not be the ones you like to eat. For instance, seedless green grapes tend to be hopelessly dependent on chemicals. Contact your local cooperative extension, and be persistent until you find someone to speak with who REALLY knows the best varieties to grow in your area. The moment someone pauses and seems to be guessing, ask to speak to someone else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
It may be possible with pears, as they do not have as many pest problems as apples and to some extent stone fruits. Much of this depends on your location and what pests abound there. You might make some explorative trips to nearby fruit farms and find out what problem, if any, they are having. There are some good organic sprays like dormant oil, but if you get a bad infestation of insects or fungus, you may have to call out the 'big guns' to fix the problem. There is much on the web about organic sprays, but I don't think these sprays represent a complete solution.
Sherwin D.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.