Iron Fertilizer Break Down Time

Is anyone familiar with the amount of time it takes the iron in most fertilizers to breakdown to a point where getting some of the soil on concrete no longer poses a rust problem?
What I'm working with it about 2% iron, and it has been watered thoroughly and deep.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm curious about this one also, if you find an answer out there post it here for me. Much appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Huh? What exactly are you talking about?
Short of proton decay, or other form of nuclear destruction, as an _element_ (not a compound) iron does not decay. Depending on soil type, watering, etc., you might flush it out of your area, but it will only go somewhere else.
What is this "rust problem"? Are you trying to prevent or avoid corrosion?
Please clarify your question.
    -frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eh dont listen to Frank, iron in the fertilizer does decay (and no we arent talking about radioactive decay) and breakdown into iron oxide when hit with water. I think he read ALOT more into your question that what you asked.
Yes, some fertilizers contain Iron, as well as some Gypsum products.
If this iron in the fertilizer hits concrete and water it will leave a rust stain.
Water and air and blah blah blah oxidozes the iron and turns it to iron oxide we like to call this rust.
How long it takes for the Iron in the mix to breakdown into iron oxide probably depends on the size of the iron in the fertilizer. I've seen some with fairly large pellets and some with what looks like shavings.
But from my experience it breaks down fairly quickly. If you water it pretty good, you should notice it rather quickly. After a week you shouldnt have a problem of staining if some stray soil happens to jump on your concrete by accident.
Anyone know exactly how long this breakdown takes before your soil becaomes concrete stain safe? I'm sure there are some sort of guidelines just have no idea where to find them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, perhaps some of my query was a tiny bit over the edge, but in the end all I was asking for was clarification.

If the fertilizer contained iron _compounds_, or if you're looking for how soluable it may be -- that will depend on factors such as particle size, pH, and a host of other factors.
One additional troublesome factor (especially if it's "chunky") is that some iron-bearing fertilizers (particularly Ironite) also contain(ed) dangerous levels of heavy metals. Some farmers have lost use of their fields from this. You might want to google this one.
HTH...     -frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank
I know I was just poking ya in the ribs. *smile*
wrote:

arent
with
rust
some
size,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Little rust try rubbing with lemon Big rust buy some rust remover- plumbing supply might have it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.