How to grow this plant?

Hi,
I have just bought Hyacinth Blue but can you tell me: How much water, how often? Does it love sun light? When its flower will grow up? What is the green thing on the surface of the soil?
Thank you so much. As you know, I am a begginer, please explain in detail.
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Markjump


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wrote:

It's a good idea first to check on-line. Often all the information you request can be found there. Input "hyacinth blue" and check out the Web sites that come up. Then, if you have more questions, post again.
Good luck and happy growing.
HB
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On Sun, 6 Nov 2011 23:13:04 +0000, Markjump

I'm not sure what green things you're talking about, but it looks like you've got 3 hyacinth bulbs in a pot with soil or bulb fiber, and covered with moss. I'm not sure, but it looks like I see the flower buds starting to appear in the center of the leaves of each bulb. Keep the soil moist but not soggy (which will let the bulbs rot), and in a cool spot like a windowsill that doesn't get frying winter sun.
Here's part of a faq I wrote on bulb forcing for this group, way back in the dark ages of 1992:
rating: Easy [hi-ah-SIN-thus] Shaded window while in flower: sunny after; Growing temp 60oF; FRAGRANT
You can purchase hyacinths in a number of forms. The quickest to bloom will be "prepared" bulbs of Dutch Hyacinths-- L'Innocence will be in bloom by Christmas if planted by early October. These will bloom about 2-3 weeks before "unprepared" bulbs.
If planting bulbs in soil, figure 3 bulbs per 6" pot of the largest size bulbs, 4-6 medium bulbs for a 6" pot. Plant with about 3/4" (1.5 cm) exposed bulb tip. Allow 8-10 weeks of chilling; a bit of leaf and a small tip of flowerbud should be visible before they are removed from the cold. Gradually bring into a 60oF dimly-lit room for growing. When flower stalks are about 4", bring them into full sunlight, but avoid temperatures over about 65oF. Allow 12-16 weeks start to finish.
Dutch hyacinths can also be grown in special "hyacinth glasses" in water, and treated much like the soil-grown plants. I have not had as much success with this as with soil culture.
Some cultivars suitable for forcing: (Dutch hyacinths that can take water culture are marked with an asterisk*)
Ann Marie: single pink; early Bismark; large single sky blue; midseason City of Harlem: soft yellow; late * Grand Maitre: single lavender; midseason Jan Bos: single red; early * King of Blues: single dark blue; late King of Lilacs: light mauve; late * L'Innocence: white single; early if prepared; midseason unprepared * La Victoire: deep red; midseason * Lady Derby: light salmon pink; midseason * Myosotis: single light blue; midseason Ostara: single blue-violet; very early * Pink Pearl: pink single; early Queen of Blues: mid blue; late Queen of Pinks: largest of pinks, late Queen of Whites: late Rosalie: small, bright pink; very early Yellow Hammer: single soft yellow, midseason
French-Roman Hyacinths are offered only in color strains of white, pink or blue. These plants should be rooted at 55-60oF, and produce short flower stalks. For continuous bloom from January on, plant every 2-3 weeks.
The whole thing is at: http://www.icangarden.com/document.cfm?task=viewdetail&itemid 48
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Thank you so much for your tutorial.
I want to know more: Do you think I should replace the pot with a bigger one? Can it grow flower again and again?
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On Tue, 8 Nov 2011 19:00:37 +0000, Markjump

These plants tend to look pretty forlorn in larger pots... they really do fairly well when grown so crowded together. The general rule I've followed is to allow the bulbs to touch when you pot them up for forcing, but not cram them into the pot. About 3 good sized hyacinth bulbs per 6" pot seems about right.
The reasons bulbs force so well indoors in rather poor light and growing conditions is that the bulbs have this year's flowers all formed inside the bulb, with sufficient nutrients to make a good show. But because of the lack of sufficient light and our warmer temperatures than the bulb would experience outdoors, you're unlikely to be able to get the same bulb to bloom next year. Most forced bulbs are simply discarded after bloom.
Those of us who feel morally obliged to keep the bulbs after bloom tend to do best when they're put in a sunny window, fertilized with a balanced fertilizer, and then heeled in outside when the ground thaws enough. With luck, you'll get some bloom from them again outdoors in 2-4 years. It's very rare, except with things like amaryllis, to be able to get repeat blooms in forced bulbs when the plants are grown solely indoors.
Kay
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i really like to help you but thing is that i am not able to recognize your plant.
as it look i think that it is a plant that require less water and need a hot atmosphere.
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covetus3090


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