growing grapes in a container

Page 2 of 2  


Must have been a heck of a drought, grapes have deep tap roots and are often grown water stressed, intentionally, to keep the berries small. The grapes of the Italian Piedmont area are Vitis venifera: Muscat, Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto. Piemonte, Italy is surrounded by mountains. It has hot summers, foggy autumns and cold winters plus calcareous marl and sandstone soils.
I'd pick a Vitis labrusca for the south eastern U.S. As I said earlier, with venifera in high humidity you will be battling mold and mildew constantly. Even then, an arbor would shade the leaves (encouraging mold and mildew). Most everywhere now, the training of the vines is allow the maximum of sunlight and breeze to penetrate the vine to reduce the occurrence of mold and mildew.
To my mind, the arbor isn't so much for shade, as it is to get you out of the world of vinyl, plastic, and steel, and put you back into contact with with the natural world of soil, plants, smells, colors, and just maybe, the miracle of life.

Nothing, except that they are vulnerable to magpie moth (Abraxas grossulariata) caterpillars and the best method for removing them is to remove the larvae by hand soon after they hatch.

--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd have grave doubts that a grape would do well in such a small container. And even if it did fruit, the amount of grapes you'd get off it wouldn't be more than a taste.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.