Fushias

Hi all
I planted fushias last year in a sunny stop and they were fine. I cleared away the dead wood in the winter and now one of the five is beginning to grow quite well but the other have sprouted new growth but they are just no coming on. Is it the weather? Should I be feeding more?
Ray
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Ray Jackson


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Ray Jackson;963999 Wrote: > Hi all

> cleared away the dead wood in the winter and now one of the five is > beginning to grow quite well but the other have sprouted new growth but > they are just no coming on. Is it the weather? Should I be feeding > more?

Hi Ray,
as to feeding them, yes, absolutely. They need rich fertile soil. A liquid ocean-based fertilizer is recommended when they start coming up, even in places where you have a wet Spring. But it could also be the weather. Where are you? Here in the Northwest ours were late this year and have only been blooming for a couple of weeks.
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rhubarb


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rhubarb;964048 Wrote: > Hi Ray,

> liquid ocean-based fertilizer is recommended when they start coming up, > even in places where you have a wet Spring. But it could also be the > weather. Where are you? Here in the Northwest ours were late this year > and have only been blooming for a couple of weeks.
Thanks. We are in the midlands and it is stance that one of the 5 is about to flower, a second is coming on fine and the other three are growing but very slowly. And they are all in the same piece of the garden. Can you recommend a feed in terms of the NPK balance. I just have a general one and one for tomatoes. Will one of these do or do I need something different?
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Ray Jackson


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HI Ray,
I have a very similar situation in my garden at the moment. I planted 2 upright fushias last year that did well, in spring I pruned away the dead wood and one of the two has come back well and looks really good with lots of flowers, while the other one is struggling. They're about half a meter away from each other so can't imagine it's anything to do with the soil, position, fertilizer etc. I put mine down the the type of plant, the one thats coped is the standard pink and purple whilst the one thats struggled is white and purple.
Intersted to hear if yours are all the same colours or if it's a similar situation to mine?
Kate
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katey_new


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katey_new;964557 Wrote: > Hi all Im hoping you can help with a bit of advice for a fairly shady > south facing wall with a 2m high trellis I have. The bottom gets very > little sun (maybe in the height of summer from 5pm), the middle gets sun > from about 2pm onwards and the top gets a fair amount of sun maybe > from midday. But in winter only the top gets late afternoon sun at > best.

> happy for 5 years or so but I managed to kill probably by incorrect > pruning.

> Ive bought recently for other spots but Im now re-thinking my plans > and want to tackle this spot as a high priority as its shaded by the > house and the kitchen window above the sink looks directly onto it so > itd be lovely to have something really pretty I can admire whilst doing > the dishes!!

> appreciated or if none of them will do what my alternatives are?

> they want full sun to partial shade but I dont really know what that > means and whether my wall would class as partial shade or not! There are plants that naturally grow out of shaded understory and come out into the sun at the top, so this is a natural condition for some plants. I have a similar wall - south facing, but substantially shaded by the house, so it mostly only gets sun higher up, and not at all in winter. Ideal conditions for clematis, though you might want to make sure by growing a shade-loving shrub at the bottom of the wall, like ferns or something - in my case the sun does get quite low down on the wall in high summer. I have both ferns and some tough evergreens to make sure that the bottom of the clematis is shaded. Hydrangea petiolaris is also doing well. I've seen climbing camellia doing well in such conditions, but you need to be sure the soil is not in any way alkaline for that. I used to have a fremontedendron which did well until the recent cold winters killed it. Other clinging evergreen wall-shrubs which could get high enough to be mostly out in the sun might like it - Azara, wall forms of pyracantha, etc. With some thought and a plant encyclopedia you could no doubt thing of many other things.
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echinosum


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